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Truck Carrying United States Visas Hijacked in Northern Mexico

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  • Truck Carrying United States Visas Hijacked in Northern Mexico

    I find it interesting that this occurred on June 7th, and I just heard about it yesterday. I tend to pay attention to matters concerning the Texas / Mexico border, since I don't live that far away, and it seems this was kept quiet. The article states that an electronic bulletin was sent out, so that the documents can't be used, but doesn't state how the process works, whether the visas and border passes are actually electronically scanned, or simply reviewed visually by border patrol employees at border crossings. There's also the mention of potential identify theft, which adds another aspect to the story. Fox News reports that the truck was hijacked in Matamoros, the Mexican city directly across the border from Brownsville, Texas.
    The U.S. Embassy in Mexico says a truck carrying visas was hijacked in northern Mexico and the visas stolen.

  • #2
    I hadn't heard of this. This kind of sounds like an inside job because it doesn't make much since. This happened in Mexico as well, so there is definitely something fishy.
    Diane Lane likes this.

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    • #3
      Yes, mairj23 You're right about that, it could be an inside job, where someone had information about the transportation of the documents, unless they make this trip on a regular basis at the same time/route, which would definitely be unwise, especially considering the locale and potential risks. I would imagine cargo of this nature would be sought after, and apparently the hijackers weren't afraid of repercussions from our government or the government of Mexico.
      mairj23 likes this.

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      • #4
        I wonder why this hasn't been more broadcasted. Makes me wonder, ya know?

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        • #5
          I think the identity theft is more hazardous for that lost visas. But really, this is the digital age and all data are supposedly electronically stored. So how can another person make use of the lost visa? It's just a piece of document. With border passes, that's a problem because returning US residents would be demanding immediate action since most of those near the south are going on vacation down the border.

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          • #6
            This is actually quite common in a lot of countries, they would just have to spot what is hijacked, what is fake and forged. I think it's a problem in the world and I think there would be a solution if the entire world was united as one country without borders,but that again wouldn't happen without love being there through all nations, and the issue of terrorism.

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            • #7
              SarahWorksAtHome Initially, I only saw it reported by the local station, but then it was also covered by Fox and I believe it was AP and my local ABC station, as well. None of them had much information, although Fox added that it occurred in Matamoros. It's such a shame that it's become so dangerous to even go near the border, let alone cross it, these days. I think a lot of things to do with the border are hushed up, it seems the truth contradicts the myth that our borders are secure. That's why I share what I see, because otherwise, people would be unaware. It's also dangerous for reporters, especially the ones in Mexico, and bloggers have been targeted by the cartels.

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              • #8
                Diane Lane I have never been the type to immediately become suspicious of things or to yell, "Conspiracy!" very quickly. I know there are usually reasons things are kept quiet. However, it does seem to be happening more and more often these days. I appreciate you sharing this as I would have not even known. I'm not the type to google news as I see most of it on my facebook newsfeed from all of the news sources pages I have followed but I suppose I should become more vigilant about keeping on top of news.
                Diane Lane likes this.

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                • #9
                  SarahWorksAtHome I understand the need for law enforcement/government agencies to keep some things quiet, but in this case, publicizing the information sooner, especially if identifying details or photos could have been released of the suspected hijackers, perhaps the public could have helped apprehend, or at least point the authorities in the direction of the perpetrators. The fact that it was kept quiet makes me wonder if this is part of an ongoing investigation. For some reason, even though it's been 5 years, and was in a different part of Mexico, it was still along the border and involved a U.S. Consulate, so this story comes to mind.
                  -- Domani Spero We've blogged previously about the US Consulate -related slayings in Ciudad Juarez in 2010.  The victims of that tragic incident were El Paso County sheriff's detention officer Arthur Redelfs, his wife Lesley Ann Enriquez Redelfs, who worked at the U.S. Consulate in Juárez, and Jorge Salcido Ceniceros, husband of Hilda Salcido who also…
                  Last edited by Diane Lane; 06-26-2015, 11:25 AM. Reason: Checking link

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                  • #10
                    This is quite common but the U.S. Government is too preoccupied with solving the world's problems instead of their own. This topic always seem to get over looked for some reason. That's why it keeps happening over and over again. There isn't a priority to stop it right now.

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