Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Missing UK student ate insects to survive

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #16
    The link is not working, by the way. It just shows the BBC homepage. Anyway, well, it's good to know that they survived that disaster and they were able to arrive home safe and sound. I wonder what kind of insects they ate just to be able to survive? Good thing to know that none of them contained poison or anything.

    Comment


    • #17
      Originally posted by sidney View Post
      The link is not working, by the way. It just shows the BBC homepage. Anyway, well, it's good to know that they survived that disaster and they were able to arrive home safe and sound. I wonder what kind of insects they ate just to be able to survive? Good thing to know that none of them contained poison or anything.
      This link should work, Sidney.

      Comment


      • #18
        I was able to find this interview with David Mackie, the student that survived by eating insects. I thought it might be interesting for those that wish to know more about his ordeal.

        http://on.aol.com/video/missing-stud...vive-518615679

        Comment


        • #19
          I'm not sure how much of a meal he would have got out of eating ants but I'm glad that he was resourceful and was able to survive. These types of stories don't always work out so well.

          Comment


          • #20
            I found this article on National Geographic that outlined the nutritional content of ants and why the U.N.recently encouraged people to eat more insects.

            You're probably thinking that it takes a lot of ants to make a meal. True. But they pack a punch: 100 grams of red ant (one of thousands of ant species) provide some 14 grams of protein (more than eggs), nearly 48 grams of calcium, and a nice hit of iron, among other nutrients. All that in less than 100 calories. Plus, they're low in carbs.

            Comment


            • #21
              I think "eating insect" sounds bad because of the impulsive "ick factor", but like kevinkimers mentioned, they are really good source of proteins (the conversion resource>protein is really much better than beef, and also other kinds of proteins!). I would be more hesitant to eat rats like they did in war times, considering how many diseases rats can carry around!

              On another insect-eating note, I think if they ground up the insects to have a sort of "flour" then they could probably become more used in common places and accepted. It would also be great for proteins without any 'ick' factor (after all, some food colorings are from mashed insects, so there's that)

              Comment


              • #22
                That was a really smart thing to do! Is important to be resourceful in emergency situations and that's what those young folks did. If I would be in that situation I would probably freaked out and died of hunger or something like that, lol. But is nice to read that those people managed to survive and they did!

                Comment

                Working...
                X