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1300 people poisoned by candies

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  • 1300 people poisoned by candies

    Philippines - A huge number of people, mostly children, were poisoned by Durian candies sold to them. The said candies were manufactured by Wendy's, a Davao based store. However, the owner of Wendy's issued a statement disowning the candies. Mayor Duterte is now ordering an investigation to know where the candies came from.

    Twelve people were arrested amidst the chaos. Meanwhile, no fatalities were recorded. Though the poisoning was mild with just nausea and vomiting symptoms with abdominal pain, this is still considered poisoning.
    THESE are the durian candies that allegedly took ill at least 40 pupils of Kidapawan City Pilot Elementary School in Kidapawan City on Thursday afternoon. The
    Diane Lane likes this.

  • #2
    This article says that police are currently investigating whether the candy was expired or deliberately laced with poison. Authorities are also suspicious about the fact that the group had traveled almost 200 miles from their home province to sell the candy.
    Diane Lane likes this.

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    • #3
      This is the first I've heard of the incident, and things like this need to be broadcast far and wide, in my opinion. I hope the government does a proper investigation, and nothing is swept under the rug. I don't trust many governments these days, since it seems corruption is rampant in every country, and matters are not always properly investigated, and even when they are, the results are not always shared the way they should be.

      Thanks for the follow up dillinger10 200 miles seems like a long way over there. If it were in Texas, I could understand that, since it's a huge state, and people often travel long distances without a second thought, but it seems a bit odd that in such a poor country, they would go such a long way simply to sell candy. I hope they find that the candy was simply expired, which is bad, but at least not as malicious as selling poisoned goods.
      Zyni and dillinger10 like this.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by Diane Lane View Post
        This is the first I've heard of the incident, and things like this need to be broadcast far and wide, in my opinion. I hope the government does a proper investigation, and nothing is swept under the rug. I don't trust many governments these days, since it seems corruption is rampant in every country, and matters are not always properly investigated, and even when they are, the results are not always shared the way they should be.

        Thanks for the follow up dillinger10 200 miles seems like a long way over there. If it were in Texas, I could understand that, since it's a huge state, and people often travel long distances without a second thought, but it seems a bit odd that in such a poor country, they would go such a long way simply to sell candy. I hope they find that the candy was simply expired, which is bad, but at least not as malicious as selling poisoned goods.
        It will be interesting to see what the investigation reveals. It would seem that the most logical explanations were that either the candies were expired and the sellers didn't know, the candies were expired and the sellers were aware of this but still sold them anyway, the candies were poisoned and the sellers didn't know or worst of all, the candies were purposefully poisoned and the sellers aware of it. Lets hope it isn't the last option which would be a truly heinous crime.

        I did read this article reporting on flea market sellers in the Philippines deliberately mislabeling expired goods so that they could sell out of date products to unsuspecting customers.
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        • #5
          I know the recipe of how to make a Durian candy. Durian candy is made of milk, condensed milk, sugar, vanilla extract and durian fruit flesh.The milk is going to be my first culprit. The milk they used might be spoiled already. Another theory of mine is magic sugar. There are some evil people who sells Sodium cyclamate aka Magic Sugar and sell it cheaper than the average refined sugar. We know that sweetener is banned in many countries.
          dillinger10 and Diane Lane like this.

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          • #6
            It truly is a shame that people perpetrate acts like that, and sell foods they know to be expired dillinger10. Unfortunately, it's often the poorest, and most desperate, citizens who are affected, since they have to take chances on buying from off the market sellers, in the hope of stretching their money far enough to survive. It sickens me that people have no consciences, and don't seem to care that people could be, and frequently are, sickened or killed from ingesting these products.

            Billy I've never heard of Magic Sugar, at least not under that name. I looked around, and there seems to be some conflicting information about whether it's harmful or not, but it is currently banned in the United States. Apparently not all countries feel the same way, because Wikipedia states that it's approved in 55 countries, while this link doesn't sound quite as favorable. http://panlasangpinoy.com/2010/03/17...d-magic-sugar/ .
            dillinger10 likes this.

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            • #7
              That is very interesting re: magic sugar. I was not aware of this either. It looks as though it was previously banned for 13 years before being declared safe and legal again back in 2013. This news, combined with the fact that it is banned in many other countries and the article Diane shared above, certainly raises concerns if this was indeed used in the making of the candies.

              I tried to see if I could find any other cases of people being poisoned by candies that used the magic sugar but was unable to come up with anything. I wonder if perhaps Billy or some of our other members might be aware of any such instances.
              Diane Lane likes this.

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              • #8
                It occurs to me,just as a sudden thought to why they don't walk from vendor to vendor and close them down for not complying with health regulations. Are they too lazy or area corrupt to bother with doing their jobs until and outbreak occurs.??
                Maybe they should forbid their children to not even buy candy from those roadside shops.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Diane Lane View Post
                  This is the first I've heard of the incident, and things like this need to be broadcast far and wide, in my opinion. I hope the government does a proper investigation, and nothing is swept under the rug. I don't trust many governments these days, since it seems corruption is rampant in every country, and matters are not always properly investigated, and even when they are, the results are not always shared the way they should be.

                  Thanks for the follow up dillinger10 200 miles seems like a long way over there. If it were in Texas, I could understand that, since it's a huge state, and people often travel long distances without a second thought, but it seems a bit odd that in such a poor country, they would go such a long way simply to sell candy. I hope they find that the candy was simply expired, which is bad, but at least not as malicious as selling poisoned goods.
                  The candy manufacturer claims that the candies used are not theirs as they pack their candies in 100s. The ones sold were packed in 10s. This case is really confusing as we do not know if the owner is telling the truth or if she is just covering up a mistake. Children are involved but thankfully no one died, still this incident is a negligence if proven that the candies are expired. However if proven that the candies are poisoned, what is the motive behind the poisoning? I just do not get why attack innocent children.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by dillinger10 View Post

                    It will be interesting to see what the investigation reveals. It would seem that the most logical explanations were that either the candies were expired and the sellers didn't know, the candies were expired and the sellers were aware of this but still sold them anyway, the candies were poisoned and the sellers didn't know or worst of all, the candies were purposefully poisoned and the sellers aware of it. Lets hope it isn't the last option which would be a truly heinous crime.

                    I did read this article reporting on flea market sellers in the Philippines deliberately mislabeling expired goods so that they could sell out of date products to unsuspecting customers.
                    Yep, some people here mislabel the items to sell it even if it is expired. It is really important here to be cautious and vigilant as you can buy expired goods without even knowing it. It is really cheaper to buy food in the flea market or our palengke but you cannot be guaranteed its safety. Some sell fresh goods, others sell tainted goods. If you want to be on the safe side, just buy at grocery stores which can be more expensive but then they are more safe.

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                    • #11
                      An update:

                      The candy maker Wendy Aquino, apologizes to the people who bought the candies. But she maintains that they make good quality candies and they are open for an investigation.

                      She said she sold a huge amount of candies to John Dequilla days before the incident. John Dequilla is one of the vendors arrested for selling the candies. He is a regular client of Wendy as she stated but he has an unusual request that day which is to send the candies in another place. She tried contacting him about the incident but he did not answer.
                      'We would never do that. We have fear in God,' says the manufacturer of Wendy's Durian Candy
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                      • #12
                        I have not heard about this magic sugar but it is quite scary reading about what you guys posted. This just scares me more to buy snacks in our local flea market. I hope they ban magic sugar for good in all countries.

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by bala View Post
                          It occurs to me,just as a sudden thought to why they don't walk from vendor to vendor and close them down for not complying with health regulations. Are they too lazy or area corrupt to bother with doing their jobs until and outbreak occurs.??
                          Maybe they should forbid their children to not even buy candy from those roadside shops.
                          You are right. This Wendy's candy store does not even have license from the Food and Drug Authority. If proven that she sold expired goods, plus this case of not having a license, she will be in jail as she made 1300 people sick. If not proven that though, they might still close her shop if the place is proven lacking in health standards.

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Briannagodess View Post

                            You are right. This Wendy's candy store does not even have license from the Food and Drug Authority. If proven that she sold expired goods, plus this case of not having a license, she will be in jail as she made 1300 people sick. If not proven that though, they might still close her shop if the place is proven lacking in health standards.
                            If the report that Wendy's does not have a FDA certificate is true, and the article seems to state quite clearly that they do not, then surely they will receive some form of punishment regardless of whether the candies are found to have been poisoned or sold beyond their expiration date.

                            It was also confirmed today that a total of 1,925 have been poisoned as a result of eating this candy.

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by bala View Post
                              It occurs to me,just as a sudden thought to why they don't walk from vendor to vendor and close them down for not complying with health regulations. Are they too lazy or area corrupt to bother with doing their jobs until and outbreak occurs.??
                              Maybe they should forbid their children to not even buy candy from those roadside shops.

                              If it's anything like here, those without the ability will purchase what and where they can. Parents of course want treats for their children, and often aren't apprised of the news covering situations such as this one. Some may not have televisions or radios. Here, and in most areas concerning the very poor, they often don't have vehicles to get to, and can't afford to shop at regular grocery shops, so will take chances with local vendors. I've worked in some places where candy, pickles, and other 'treats' are sold out of homes, through windows, or the people simply walk in and make their purchases. These people are not licensed to sell their goods, so there are no inspections of the premises or products.

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