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Alaska Wildfires Increasing

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  • #16
    I have been hearing the same thing. We are suppose to go into another ice age in 2030. My boyfriend has been harping on that and trying to make certain we are prepared for it. Hard to fathom that with the increase in heat that the world will go cold all of a sudden. What do they mean by it will 'go to sleep'? Can you clarify more on that Tumbleweed?
    Where there is an beginning, there is an end.
    Where there is an end, there is a new beginning.

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    • #17
      Here is a video from Youtube that explains the whole phenomenon pretty well, KimberlyD. It is pretty scary to watch when he gives us some of the death (starvation mostly) statistics from the 1600-1700 when the sun was alseep the last time.
      We probably have a better chance of making it through this mini ice age; since we have better skills at growing things in greenhouses and other farming techniques.
      However, the world population is much larger than it was 400 years ago, so there are a whole lot more people in the world that would have to be fed.

      No matter what; it is NOT going to be good if this happens.

      http://youtu.be/7whL9jvdL5s

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      • #18
        Now that you creeped me out for the day Tumbleweed with that video, I don't think we have too much to worry about as you said. Our technology today will most likely save us from it. We have the ability to keep warmer then they did back then and we do have ways to keep food in production.... of course industries will try to make the most of it and the price for food will most likely soar along with electricity. That is why we are building our own green house and raising our own livestock. Plus we are using other sources of energy, we have no way to hook into a electrical grid where we are anyway. Either way, we will be prepared and most of the world should be fine..... but that video did creep me out. LOL
        Where there is an beginning, there is an end.
        Where there is an end, there is a new beginning.

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        • #19
          I am not sure if anyone else read this Pacific Standard article that contains a graphic depicting smoke circling the globe from wildfires in Alaska and Canada between July 1 and July 15. If not, I am posting the graphic below as it shows just how far the smoke has traveled. As of last week, the wildfires have affected nearly 21,000 square miles of land in Alaska and Canada.

          During the first two weeks of July, wildfire smoke plumes from North America circled the top of the globe, blowing west over Russia and east over the United States. A handful of northern U.S. states had to put out air advisories. (Minnesota was hit particularly hard.)

          Image Copyright: Jesse Allen/Colin Seftor.

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          • #20
            I have noticed a bit of haziness outside of late. Mountains that are usually clear are a bit unclear now. I assumed it was just my eyes, but seeing your graphic tells me it might be smoke. I don't smell any smoke though and I haven't had any issues breathing like I usually do in these circumstances.
            Where there is an beginning, there is an end.
            Where there is an end, there is a new beginning.

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            • #21
              The Washington Post published this article over the weekend highlighting the extensive damage caused by the wildfires in Alaska so far this summer. The writer does a good job of putting this in perspective - the almost 5 million acres that have burned in Alaska so far this year is greater than the entire state of Connecticut.

              Consequences of temperatures rising by more than 3 degrees in Alaska in the past fifty-years, include an annual loss of 75 billion metric tons of ice from its glaciers and the destabilization of permafrost.

              In May, Alaska experienced its hottest temperatures in 91 years of record-keeping, 7.1 degrees Fahrenheit above average. As a result, seasonal snowmelt was well ahead of schedule, allowing the ground to dry out sooner.

              In late June, 152 fires were lighted in a single weekend, mostly by lightning strikes. Since then, the number of acres burned has leapt forward by sometimes as much as 300,000 a day. The current record year, 2004, saw 6.59 million acres burned, but 2015 is ahead of its pace — although thanks to recent rainfall, the pace of burn has slowed.
              It is a lengthy piece but does provide some excellent information regarding the increase in temperatures and the effect it has had on the state and the frequency of larger wildfires.

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              • #22
                That's not good... the loss of the ice would mean more danger to the polar bears that are already in danger as it is.

                152 fires in one weekend?! My goodness.... and mostly due to lightening strikes.... Wow, I really don't know what to say on that.

                Alaska is experiencing a hotter then normal summer while we are experiencing a cooler then normal one. Last night I slept with two blankets I got so cold... and you have people out there trying to claim that climate change is a lie. Go figure.
                Where there is an beginning, there is an end.
                Where there is an end, there is a new beginning.

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                • #23
                  wildfires increases due to many factors that humane are doing to the nature in return Natural need to do something to us right that why Nature gives a bang like Tsunami, Floods, Torundo, Wildfires, Drought and Many more. As Wildfire is about a large amount of fire catching on brush or wooden. As this is increasing due to Globalization. We are polluting the nature and increasing the air pollution level day by day. That is the many reason for increase of Wildfire on Earth.
                  Alaska’s Wildfires was spread more than 5 million acres burned last year, are destroying a main buffer against climate changes.

                  https://www.rapidresponse.org.in

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