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Building A Firelane

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  • Building A Firelane

    We all hear about natural disasters like wildfires, and how they can burn through hundreds of thousands of acres. Recently, I posted something about the wildfire in Yarnell Az. that killed 19 Hotshot firefighters two years ago. What I did not include in that post or the link I put in, was information about the homes in Yarnell that were destroyed. Specifically, I did not mention that there was one house in the middle of all this that was spared. How was it spared? The more religious among us will credit the shrine of St. Joseph that was and still is on the property. The more pragmatic among us will see the fact that the property had a fire-lane, or fire-break, around the property. The only property in the area to have one.

    Natural disasters can cause a lot of damage and take your property with it. It doesn't have to be that way though. It really is amazing what a properly built and maintained fire-break can do to save your property from a personal disaster amid a natural disaster.

    http://www.usatoday.com/story/news/n...nding/7923327/

    Building and maintaining a permanent firelane or firebreak will protect your forested property from wildfire as well as improve forest access and provide wildlife openings. Here are some tips on installing a firelane.
    ASurvivor and fcphdJim like this.

  • #2
    That's excellent information. Thanks for sharing it.

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    • #3
      I've heard of the traditional firewall but this is the first time I'm hearing of a fire lane. It's a new innovation and good to see it's living up to its reputation as a strategy to deter fire. I live in a place where properties are built so close to each other. If only real estate developers would start taking note of fire lanes and stop building row houses. Firewalls alone aren't sufficient.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by xTinx View Post
        I live in a place where properties are built so close to each other. If only real estate developers would start taking note of fire lanes and stop building row houses.
        Agreed. I live in the country, but when I do get to the city, Phoenix, and see all those new developments........all I see is a tragedy waiting to happen. I could never live in a neighborhood like that.

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        • #5
          Fire lines can save property, but if the winds are very strong, the fire is basically guaranteed to jump any know me because burning embers can be blown a very long way. Maintaining fireflies should still be a priority, but people need to remember not to rely on them as a guarantee that they are safe.

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