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Meat Packaged 40 Years Ago Confiscated in China

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  • Meat Packaged 40 Years Ago Confiscated in China

    Apparently it's been frozen for 40 years, or at least some of it has, although who knows whether it was thawed at some point along the way. It seems the origin of the meat is unknown, and some of it was destined for online sales. This could have been a real problem if these products reached end users, so it's great that this shipment was found and stopped, but if this meat has been sitting in freezers for 40 years, how much more is there floating around that the government isn't aware of, that could someday end up online or in shops or restaurants?
    dillinger10 and fcphdJim like this.

  • #2
    Alarming news to say the least. According to the FDA, uncooked whole poultry can be frozen safely for up to 12 months, uncooked steaks or chops can be frozen for anywhere from 4 to 12 months and uncooked ground meat can be safely frozen for a maximum of 4 months. It's no wonder one local official was quoted as saying that the meat "was really smelly".

    What I am unsure about, and perhaps others can provide an answer, is why this meat had a valuation of $1.6 million. Was it really possible that whomever was buying this would actually ignore the overwhelming stench and rotten nature of the meat and serve this in restaurants or in their stores?
    Diane Lane likes this.

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    • #3


      Yeesh. That does, sort of, redefine the expression "mystery meat." I'm glad they nailed it before it went to market.
      Zyni and Diane Lane like this.
      "Success is survival." ~ Leonard Cohen

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      • #4
        I really cannot comprehend that 40-year old meat to be frozen and still edible? When it comes to expiry dates, all food establishments, distributors, manufacturers and other firms handling food should be aware of the expiry date. As per the question of Diane Lane, what happens if those goods would reach the consumer? I dread it.
        Diane Lane likes this.

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        • #5
          dillinger10 I had the same exact question. As far as consumption, perhaps the frozen meat could possibly be sold without the buyers (or end users) realizing how out of date it was, which could be tragic. The only other way I could see that this shipment would have such a value would be as a weapon. In that way, it could be used as a method of sickening and/or killing a large group of people, which could be the end goal, or the goal could simply be to cause a panic. When something like that happens, governments, companies, and consumers search for solutions (often quick ones), in the form of new methods of processing, inspecting, or handling products, or perhaps toward a specific trusted supplier? Those solutions are often very profitable, whether initially, or long-term, though lucrative government contracts.
          dillinger10 likes this.

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          • #6
            An interesting thought, Diane. The first thing that came to mind for me was "what a waste." How did so much meat end up being overlooked for all this time? I'm more curious about how this situation came to be. I agree that the "value" of the tainted meat is questionable. Even if it were going to be fed to animals (made into pet foods etc) I don't see how it could be legal to still sell it as "food." It's probably the stuff they ship to the US. Remember all the poison dog food a few years back?
            Diane Lane likes this.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Diane Lane View Post
              dillinger10 I had the same exact question. As far as consumption, perhaps the frozen meat could possibly be sold without the buyers (or end users) realizing how out of date it was, which could be tragic. The only other way I could see that this shipment would have such a value would be as a weapon. In that way, it could be used as a method of sickening and/or killing a large group of people, which could be the end goal, or the goal could simply be to cause a panic. When something like that happens, governments, companies, and consumers search for solutions (often quick ones), in the form of new methods of processing, inspecting, or handling products, or perhaps toward a specific trusted supplier? Those solutions are often very profitable, whether initially, or long-term, though lucrative government contracts.
              I was doing a little more research tonight regarding the potential for consumption and I came across this article by Food Safety News that says last year, a company that sold meat to major multinational food stores in China, such as McDonald’s, KFC and Starbucks, was accused of mixing what was believed to be expired meat in with their fresher supplies. If this is true, perhaps similar actions would be taken with this meat. Take the old expired meat, mix it in with fresh meat and hope that the buyers would be none the wiser.

              The Guardian also chimed in to say that often times these expired meats would be transported in ordinary vehicles, rather than refrigerated ones, to save costs which meant that ultimately the meat was thawed out several times before ever reaching customers, further increasing the likelihood of contamination.
              Diane Lane and Zyni like this.

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              • #8
                I can't imagine a stock of 40-year old preserved meat distributed around like that. Why did these meat reach that length of time before being sold? What were the people who packaged it 40 years ago thinking? This is a cause of alarm because these meats are totally un-edible. Imagine how much bacteria it harbors. This meat is even older than me.
                Diane Lane likes this.

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                • #9
                  Great research, as usual, dillinger10. That is not only disgusting, but truly frightening. The potential for sickness and even death due to mixing this garbage in with fresh food is staggering. Is this even illegal there? I hope not. Of course, that doesn't always matter. We've seen contaminated food sold here in the US as well.
                  Last edited by Zyni; 07-15-2015, 01:52 PM.
                  Diane Lane likes this.

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                  • #10
                    That truly is frightening, dillinger10. It's unconscionable that someone would put greed (or something even more sinister?) ahead of health of people and animals to me. Someone who would do that is irredeemable in my opinion, and has no regard for human life. I've heard before of trucks being stopped, both with broken refrigeration systems, and unrefrigerated ones, with meat inside, here in the U.S.

                    Zyni using this as pet food, or mixing it in with pet food wouldn't surprise me at all. More and more people here in the U.S. are making their own pet food for that reason, after what you described, when we fed our pets tainted products from China, causing illness and death of our beloved animals. gracer 40 years seemed like a long time, but your age comment really brought it home. It's amazing that anyone could think a food product that old would not kill, and these people should be prosecuted.
                    dillinger10 likes this.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Zyni View Post
                      Great research, as usual, dillinger10. That is not only disgusting, but truly frightening. The potential for sickness and even death due to mixing this garbage in with fresh food is staggering. Is this even illegal there? I hope so. Of course, that doesn't always matter. We've seen contaminated food sold here in the US as well.
                      Yes, this is illegal. Professor Cao Binghai, of Chinese Agricultural University claims that as much as two million tonnes of beef had been smuggled into China between 2012 and 2013.

                      This article published by The South China Morning Post exposes one of the illegal smuggling routes. It appears that smugglers have been shipping hundreds of thousands of tonnes of beef from India into Guangxi through the Vietnamese city of Haiphong. Once the beef was in Guangxi, it would be sold and served up in Hot Pot restaurants across the country. It would appear that this was a second illegal route as the frozen beef was smuggled in from the Americas through through Hong Kong and Haiphong.

                      The last paragraph is extremely concerning. One would imagine the public are being advised against eating heavily marinated or strongly flavored meats because these strong flavors could potentially mask the taste of rotten or expired meat.
                      Last edited by dillinger10; 06-27-2015, 02:16 PM.
                      Zyni and Diane Lane like this.

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                      • #12
                        I find it so disturbing dillinger10 that people have no problem selling products that they know could or will harm or kill others. I can't wrap my head around how people who would do something like that can live with themselves, let alone that it appears to be a thriving business. I certainly hope the government cracks down on this type of venture. I'd be extremely leery of eating any meat over there, especially from unknown sources. I can see why people are leaning more toward meat they know is sourced from free range ranches here in the United States.

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                        • #13
                          Given the number of food safety scandals in China in recent years, it appears that whatever the government are doing is not working.

                          I found this article by The BBC dating back to 2013 which documents another meat scandal in China that resulted in 900 people being arrested for selling fake or tainted meat within a three month period. Some of the details that came to light are shocking, including news that suspects were manufacturing fake mutton from foxes, mink and rats after adding chemicals while other suspects used a hydrogen peroxide solution to process chicken claws and injected water into meat to increase its weight.

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                          • #14
                            40 Years? I am just wondering how it was preserved. If by freezer then probably the sellers father is the one who first owned it. As for matter, it is very good that it was confiscated. If not, maybe lots of people have died due to food poisoning .

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                            • #15
                              When the animals were slaughtered to create all these meats, My parents were like on their early teens. Imagine they were selling these for human consumption? Just imagine if a family ends up buying a 40 year old meat. This is a mass poisoning in the making. It is a good thing that this monstrosity is prevented from sending people to hospitals. Why does China always have a food controversy?

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