Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

72 people killed at a factory fire in Philippines

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • 72 people killed at a factory fire in Philippines

    A fire at a footwear factory in the Philippines has killed 72 people. Five people were pulled out alive from the burning factory and taken to a local hospital. It remains unclear as to how the fire started although this article by CNN, citing the city government, reports that the initial investigations indicate that the fire was caused by sparks from welding work on the factory's gate that set alight chemicals in nearby containers. This report by the AP, says that the police are investigating the fire as a criminal matter as iron grills on windows of the factory trapped workers on the second floor and prevented the victims from escaping. The police are also investigating concerns as to whether the factory followed fire and building safety standards.

    The reports in both articles contain some graphic descriptions of bodies being burned beyond recognition and relatives trying to identify the charred remains through jewelry or other personal items.

  • #2
    Lax safety standards coupled with negligence are a nasty combination. This is coupled with a corrupt police force and military. I am pretty sure the factory owner will pay off the police. Political and economic pressure needs to be put on the Philippines so they straighten out their corruption problem. Without outside pressure nothing will change.

    Comment


    • #3
      Very sorry to say that Safety and personal safety is the least concern of the people of the Philippines.Everything is paid and happens under the table name it and it happens,for instance passing a driving test, safety inspections, Restaurants Food and Agriculture Sanitation Inspection to even hospital Health and Inspection. They did not even have a fire escape plans posted in the building not even a fire extinguisher.

      Comment


      • #4
        Someone was talking about corruption in one of the comments. That's an entirely different issue, though. It would be more sensible to attribute part of that catastrophe to extreme weather changes. Luzon is currently on the verge of a heat wave. Everyone knows the whole country becomes highly flammable from the month of March onwards. Not to mention it's suffering from El Niño. What the Philippines lacks is a sound industrial disaster management program in addition to impact assessments. Hot weather + non-adherence to ISO policies = tragic disaster.

        Comment


        • #5
          This report in Aljazeera raises more safety questions such as why were the factory workers welding next to the chemical storage room. It is also unclear as to whether the building had any fire exits and it was also reported that the workers had received no fire safety training. To compound matters further, it is believed that the explosion hit the building entrance and also blocked the staircase, eliminating the quickest escape route for the workers.

          Comment


          • #6
            Workers at the factory told reporters from the AFP today that the owners never ran fire drills to practice for an emergency, paid below the country’s minimum wage, withheld legally required insurance payments and forced them to work 12 hour shifts every day without weekends.

            The factory owners responded by insisting that they were in compliance with safety laws and that they factory had passed its most recent safety inspection last year.

            Comment


            • #7
              I hope the family of the victims will get some sort of compensation financially because they just lost the one who provides for them. For sure financial help will not kill away the pain because money can’t buy life. The money will be a huge help though so the families of the victims will find a way to help them recover to find some sort of livelihood. I think the widows of the victims should be given jobs so they will be able to provide for the family after the death of the provider. I think those employees don’t have healthcare and insurance as well.

              The owner of that factor should help the families of the victims.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by Billy View Post
                I hope the family of the victims will get some sort of compensation financially because they just lost the one who provides for them. For sure financial help will not kill away the pain because money can’t buy life. The money will be a huge help though so the families of the victims will find a way to help them recover to find some sort of livelihood. I think the widows of the victims should be given jobs so they will be able to provide for the family after the death of the provider. I think those employees don’t have healthcare and insurance as well.

                The owner of that factor should help the families of the victims.
                This CNN article states that the Valenzuela City Mayor has told the victims families that authorities will provide them with support, including help with burials, food and health care. He also said that the government has set up an assistance center for families. Meanwhile, this article by Thinkprogress cites the factory owners as saying that they have pledged financial assistance to the families of the dead.

                Reuters just published this article which takes a deeper look into the unsafe working conditions in Philippines. The article claims that companies pass the regular government safety checks simply because they only need to submit documents - typically no physical inspection is conducted and so they don't get to see the actual working environment.
                Billy likes this.

                Comment


                • #9
                  It was announced today that representatives for the factory have dispensed an initial $295 (13,000 pesos) to survivors and families of the victims o this horrible fire. This prompted the mayor to criticize the company saying that it was paltry sum and that once again the workers and their families have been let down. He further added that this was indicative of the way the owners treat their employees.

                  More can be read here.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by dillinger10 View Post
                    Workers at the factory told reporters from the AFP today that the owners never ran fire drills to practice for an emergency, paid below the country’s minimum wage, withheld legally required insurance payments and forced them to work 12 hour shifts every day without weekends.

                    The factory owners responded by insisting that they were in compliance with safety laws and that they factory had passed its most recent safety inspection last year.

                    I live in the Philippines 6 month out of the year and they have a different way of handling and passing fire safety. They just pay them off, that's it. There is no fire exits, fire extinguishers, or alarms. It is much cheaper to pay off the inspectors then it is to make improvements to the building.

                    As far unfair employee practices, it's rampant. There is not enough jobs so nobody is going to complain.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by dillinger10 View Post
                      It was announced today that representatives for the factory have dispensed an initial $295 (13,000 pesos) to survivors and families of the victims o this horrible fire. This prompted the mayor to criticize the company saying that it was paltry sum and that once again the workers and their families have been let down. He further added that this was indicative of the way the owners treat their employees.

                      More can be read here.

                      In the states, you would never see this happening. If there was wrongful deaths involved you would bet that there would be lawsuits and insurance claims. Here in the Philippines they want money immediately. Anything you give them is never enough.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by dillinger10 View Post

                        This CNN article states that the Valenzuela City Mayor has told the victims families that authorities will provide them with support, including help with burials, food and health care. He also said that the government has set up an assistance center for families. Meanwhile, this article by Thinkprogress cites the factory owners as saying that they have pledged financial assistance to the families of the dead.

                        Reuters just published this article which takes a deeper look into the unsafe working conditions in Philippines. The article claims that companies pass the regular government safety checks simply because they only need to submit documents - typically no physical inspection is conducted and so they don't get to see the actual working environment.

                        These type of sweat shops are all over the place. The city and its officials failed its people. They know they screwed up and they are trying to make up for it. That's all this is. Only when stories like this hit the masses do they ever get up and do anything to as they say in the Philippines "SAVE FACE".

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          The welder who was responsible for the welding repairs of the factory's gate turned himself in to police today. He admitted that he was repairing the roll-up metal gate which was in close proximity to the area where highly combustible chemicals were stored.

                          The welder told police that the factory secretary assured him it would be safe to do repairs in the area since the chemicals were already covered with canvas. However, within seconds of starting the repair work, the chemicals were ignited causing a small fire. It is reported that the secretary attempted to douse the fire by pouring water on it but the fire grew out of control and consumed the entire factory.

                          More on this latest development can be read here.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            While looking for more information pertaining to the working conditions in the Philippines, I came across this article published by Quartz which claims that the Philippines has one of the lowest average manufacturing worker wages in all of Asia.

                            According to a 2014 survey, last year, the average monthly wage for a factory worker in the Philippines was $249. This is still two-and-a-half times more than those living in Bangladesh.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              I'm confused about why would a factory have iron grills over the windows. It was not a prison, was it? Is there more information about what will happen to the welder? Anyhow this is terrible, I feel sorry for everyone involved.

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X