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Are you prepared for an earthquake?

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  • Are you prepared for an earthquake?

    Are you prepared for an earthquake? Do you know what you're supposed to do? Do you have an evacuation plan? What is your evacuation plan? Would you prefer to stay inside, close to your door, or would you rather try to make a run for it to get outside? Do you have some supplies at home, in case you need to survive for a couple of days buried under rubble?

  • #2
    I know what to do and I have supplies, but if you are buried under rubble, you will not likely be able to access your supplies, likely you will not be able to move more than a few inches. Earthquake preparedness is limited due to the fact that there is no warning before serious destruction occurs. You can't flee the building usually.

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    • #3
      That's the scary thing about earthquakes - you don't know when they will strike and the destruction happens so quickly, there really isn't time to do much. I lived in Virginia a few years ago, when we were hit with a 6 point earthquake. Virginia, historically, never has earthquakes, so it came as a huge shock to most of us. It actually took 10-15 seconds to realize that the rumbling and shaking we felt was something to be concerned about. My husband and I just looked at each other, trying to figure out what had happened, at first we thought that a tree had fallen on the house. We were lucky that the quake wasn't destructive - because in that 10 second period that it took us to realize what was happening, the whole house could have been destroyed, burying us under tons of brick and stone. The quake only lasted about 45 seconds, which we were told later was actually a very long earthquake. Most last less than 30 seconds. It's really hard to protect yourself when you only have seconds to act.

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      • #4
        Preparation always should begin with self, everything else is a subset of concern. People who rely on material preparations and having logically thought out plans will be disappointed when disasters like earthquakes do occur, because there is no way humans can precisely tell where and when it will happen - so for all I know, one can be walking up the middle of a stairs in a skyscraper, and a 8.0 Richter scaled earthquakes occur, what are you going to do then without your prepare materials and planning?! To acquire essential survival knowledge and to practice them a lot is the best preparation an humans has against disasters.

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        • #5
          Right, so basically there isn't much you can really do to improve your chances in case of an earthquake. I suppose, if you have this opportunity, you could build your own house with all the modern anti earthquake features, to prevent it from collapsing in the first place, but as you have said, the earthquakes seem to have a habit of striking whenever they want and you might find yourself on the stairs of some other building.

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          • #6
            Coming from an earthquake-prone country, I remember that we always have this earthquake drill at school. Students will be instructed what to do in case of an earthquake. When I was working, we also have this earthquake drill with all the building occupants. The most that I can remember is not to panic during an earthquake. When people panic, stampede can happen which can cause death. Just stay calm, go down the stairs until you reach the ground.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by JulianWilliams View Post
              Are you prepared for an earthquake?
              I am prepared fairly well.

              Do you know what you're supposed to do?
              Yes, I do. Have experienced moderate earthquakes before and have trained to deal with them.

              Do you have an evacuation plan?
              Yes, I do.

              What is your evacuation plan?
              It is a fairly flexible plan that takes into account many possibilities. It boils down to choosing the primary transportation method, choosing one of the bug-out location points, communicating my intentions to specific people, and then leaving, all based on the specific circumstances.

              Would you prefer to stay inside, close to your door, or would you rather try to make a run for it to get outside?
              Definitely stay where I am when the shaking starts. Drop down in a crouch next to a stout piece of furniture in case of building collapse. Only after the shaking would I try to go outside. If I was outside when it happened, I would move to a clear area away from anything that could fall on me, if I could, crouch down, and wait it out. I would never try to run out of a building during an earthquake as that only increases the danger of being hurt by falling objects.

              Do you have some supplies at home, in case you need to survive for a couple of days buried under rubble?
              I do have supplies at home, some positioned where I can get them if trapped, as long as I am not literally pinned down by debris. And where I am located most of the time, there is water and some kind of snack within arms reach.
              I live on the top floor (3rd) of my apartment building primarily because I do not want to be on a lower floor and have the building come down on me. I would rather ride the earthquake out and take my chances with the height.

              Just my opinion.
              Jerry D Young

              Prepare for the worst and hope for the best and always remember TANSTAAFL
              (There Ain't No Such Thing As A Free Lunch - Robert A Heinlein)

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              • #8
                Yes I am. I live in Florida, so there is nothing to worry about here. I'm not quite sure about the protocols people follow in earthquake areas. Hopefully there are no more earthquakes but that's wishful thinking.

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                • #9
                  I'd be 70 percent prepared but 30 percent of the whole scheme of things, I pretty much couldn't control. For instance, I have no control over the quake's magnitude. I also won't be able to control where the epicenter will be or how long the ground will shake. The least I can do is get far away as possible from tall buildings and large infrastructures into an open space.

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                  • #10
                    Not yet,but i have already initiated an action plan.I have a emergency exit window from where i can jump out to safety and i have bought a new iron cupboard,with a hole drilled at the back for ventilation and i have placed it at the corner of our home.
                    I don't know if this will suffice,but for the moment i feel safe..

                    Pls suggest.

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                    • #11
                      To be honest, if it was to hit at a strong magnitude tomorrow, I would not be prepared for it. I could run out into an open filed so that nothing will fall on me but that's about it. I have yet to start my doomsday shelter because of the lack of funds. I have secured a location, but the funding to build it is out of reach at the moment. At the moment I have enough water to last me awhile, but I do not have a stock pile of food. I would like to have at least a weeks worth of food rations just in case anything happens.

                      My current dwelling is a 2 story concrete home. But I do question the quality of the building materials. If I feel a slight tremor coming on, I'm hitting the street in my underwear and then to a open field. I have a strong feeling my house is coming down.

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                      • #12
                        We only ever experience infrequent small tremors here in the UK - there is little seizmic activity at all. So I'm afraid to say that I know little about what to during an event of greater magnitude. Is it better to stay put or is it better to run towards an open space? I expect it would depend on many factors, such as the proximity of tall buildings but on the whole, what's the best course of action?

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                        • #13
                          Somewhat. We do have already some supplies like food and water, survival items and kits, flashlights in any case and self-awareness. I'm ready if one happens, as I know what to do during and after an earthquake.

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                          • #14
                            Honestly, NO is my answer to the thread title. I just try to condition my mind that when a disaster strikes, I should have presence of mind and I should not lose my focus. There's not much we can prepare for in the event of earthquakes because we do not know when it will strike unlike typhoons which can be predicted.

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                            • #15
                              Honestly, no one can ever escape a killer quake. You can run out of your house in a moderate quake or stand at the threshold of a door to avoid coming under falling concrete, but nothing can be done in a quake of magnitude over 6.

                              A quake is sudden and hits you without any warning and everything is over in a matter of seconds. The best thing is to build quake-resistant houses with a Japanese technology. Japanese enjoy earthquakes as they swing in their houses back and forth.

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