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Do you believe in rain water harvesting?

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  • Do you believe in rain water harvesting?

    Famine is a humongous issue. It not only causes huge-scale starvation, but can also spread epidemics. How about harvesting rainwater and using it for drinking and farming purposes? The excess exploitation of ground water and polluting surface water with industrial wastes have made us pay a big price. Digging ponds, soaking pits and harvesting roof-top rainwater can yield positive results and save us from droughts. Your thoughts?

  • #2
    Most people look out for monetary benefits in all sorts of activities.To them too,it is a big plus,rain water harvesting can help use surplus water for gardening, flushing toilets, washing cars and supports the building association to have an alternative source of water during peak summers.We need to start saving ground water because the bores drilled earlier have depleted it too badly.

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    • #3
      I honestly do not know very much about it but I believe I've heard about it before in relation to becoming self-sufficient and/or homesteading.
      I have considered trying to change the way me and my household are operating so as to be more like that and be able to be more prepared and self-sufficient. How is this able to be done on a small scale as in for one household? Can anyone explain it to me in further as in a how-to or point me towards where I could search for more information on it?

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      • #4
        I remember when I was still a small girl, around 5 or 6 year-s of age. Whenever there was a strong storm in our area, our electricity and water supply usually stop due to damaged equipments from the providers. My mother would usually utilize rainwater coming from our roof. For use in the toilet and other cleaning purposes, we had several barrel containers stationed in areas of the house where the flow of water from the roof is strongest. The barrels would eventually get full and we had enough water to use for a day or two. For drinking, my mother had a specific area where she collected rainwater from. She used to catch rainwater into a big kettle, from the roof through our bedroom window. She made sure though that she only collected rainwater for drinking after around 5 days of continuous rains. She would always use a self-made filter for the kettle top and tip by wrapping them with clean cloths. Then she would boil the water for 15 minutes to 30 minutes and we already had edible water to drink.

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        • #5
          SarahWorksAtHome Texas A&M has a comprehensive collection of information about this. Take a look at their five videos here. I haven't watched them myself, but based on all the information on their site I'm guessing that the videos will answer most questions.
          SarahWorksAtHome and dillinger10 like this.

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          • #6
            Yes, water harvesting is somewhat a powerful thing. Everytime it rains, we put a container outside to be filled with water. Most african countries practice rain harvesting for the rain is their only water source because water is very rare in africa. I have also seen a documentary that there are people putting up a wide net or screen on top of the mountain, somewhat like a spider web. It would get every moist from the air and fog. Every drop of water is important and every drop coming from that screen would be used as their water for survival.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Jade Mae View Post
              Yes, water harvesting is somewhat a powerful thing. Everytime it rains, we put a container outside to be filled with water. Most african countries practice rain harvesting for the rain is their only water source because water is very rare in africa. I have also seen a documentary that there are people putting up a wide net or screen on top of the mountain, somewhat like a spider web. It would get every moist from the air and fog. Every drop of water is important and every drop coming from that screen would be used as their water for survival.
              More like tapping it in a bucket ?
              Would that suffice for home needs ?
              They could have a catchment area at least,at a cheap price and then use Alum to purify it from the drain.We cannot use it for drinking,but vehicle cleaning/washrooms,utensils should go well with this.

              In fact many an african countries have adopted this.It is easy and shouldn't involve more than a couple of hundred dollars.

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              • #8
                I remember there are machines and water tanks created to harvest them. It is actually a good option for a single family or a single person. It is not enough though to give water supply to a whole city or nation. If every single family though will be able to do this voluntarily it could be a huge help for them. It is not something that can be helpful on a mass produce situation. I know someone who have this tank outside their house that gathers rain water and that is what they use for drinking.

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                • #9
                  Harvesting rain water for practical uses is one good way of conservation. Our science teacher in grade school was urging us to think of ways to use rain water. She said that rain water is abundant during the rainy season and it comes free. So if we find a way of using it then we have contributed something good to mankind.

                  I have a friend who had his house constructed in 2001. He had designed a cistern underneath the kitchen. He said that rainwater would go directly to that cistern for storage and a hose will siphon it for future use. Now, the only problem is the proper storage because the cistern tends to get dust and other elements, not to mention insects.

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                  • #10
                    When I lived in Idaho and hauled water, I always had large 55-gallon drums at the corners of the house where the water ran out of the rain gutters. Rain water is much better for watering your plants because it does not have chlorine, fluoride, and other harmful chemicals in the water, plus it has more oxygen; so it really helps your garden to grow better.
                    My friend had an underground water cistern, and she collected every bit of rainwater that came off of the eaves from her house and the garage and barn , as well. She used that for eveything except drinking water, and the only time she had to pack water was in the very hottest months of the year when we didn't get rain for a long time.
                    It is pretty easy to set up barrels, or other large containers so that the water from the raingutters runs into the barrels. You can either get barrels with a faucet on the bottom to attach to a hose, or you can just siphon out the water as you use it.
                    I also collected snow in the winter. I had a large trash can in the bathroom, plus I filled up the bathtub every night with snow. I shoveled it into 5-gallon buckets and carried it into the house until I had both the tub and the trash barrel heaping full of snow. By morning, it had melted, and I had water for washing and flushing the toilet.
                    Even when you actually have running water, it is a good plan to catch the rainwater just to water your garden and house plants.

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                    • #11
                      I am absolutely in favor of harvesting rain water. I think it should be much more common practice. In cities, you don't even need to collect all that much to keep a small garden going unless your area is particularly arid. I think it would save a lot of water from needing to be treated if most people saved some roof run off from each rainstorm for garden watering later on.

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                      • #12
                        I believe water does help a lot when it comes to harvesting, in fact, it is essential and I don't understand those people who curse and say God is mad at us, which is why he is making it rain. I don't understand because without rain the entire earth would just be dry and cause a lot of famine, so we would die.

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                        • #13
                          Although I don't practice it, I will be practicing it in the future when I have decided on the location of my future homestead. Philippines is notoriously hot and dry. So having a back up source of water is crucial. I won't be able to pump the water out of the ground all the time. There has to be a back up source that is readily available.

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by JoshPosh View Post
                            Although I don't practice it, I will be practicing it in the future when I have decided on the location of my future homestead. Philippines is notoriously hot and dry. So having a back up source of water is crucial. I won't be able to pump the water out of the ground all the time. There has to be a back up source that is readily available.
                            U use the bore well technique ?
                            Like anything in the vicinity of your house ?.Kindly enforce it and brief across to a few other people too,that way the knowledge spreads across and its easy to cut down on the scarcity of water.

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                            • #15
                              I just realized a friend of mine is doing this. He's going to show me his set-up later this week. He's just doing it in small barrels for his garden and washing his vehicles or for his two sons to fill their water toys or water guns with this summer. He has one with some sort of filter on top and one without for his garden purpose. He mentioned having to put something around it now to keep mosquitos away.

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