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  • Indian marriages.

    Recently, I've been itching to talk about this topic. The food waste at Indian Marriages is tremendous. I've even stopped attending these. Parents use all their money they collected over a lifetime on their children marriages. What are your thoughts about this? Ever been to an Indian Marriage before?

  • #2
    I'm more concerned about people being forced by their families to marry some person they might not want to by the food wasted at their wedding. Sure, the food wastage is an issue as well, but most people only get married once in their life, so things aren't THAT bad regarding this issue.

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    • #3
      I am Indian too,and strictly against all this grandeur,but there is way that has been devised to not let the food go waste.All a person needs to do is call up 1008 and representatives will arrive to collect the food left over.This in turn will be used to feed the poor and the needy.

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      • #4
        I have heard about arranged marriages in India, but do not know anyone who has been involved in one of these marriages before. I have a few Indian friends and they do fed you very well. After I get done at a dinner or party I leave completely stuffed. That is good that there are charities you can call who will pick up the extra food.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by bala View Post
          I am Indian too,and strictly against all this grandeur,but there is way that has been devised to not let the food go waste.All a person needs to do is call up 1008 and representatives will arrive to collect the food left over.This in turn will be used to feed the poor and the needy.
          That is a great idea. Food wastage is a serious problem all over the world and especially at such lavish events as weddings. It is a crying shame that so much food is wasted when there are so many people starving over the world.

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          • #6
            Do they really throw away a lot of food or do they give it to guests to take it home? If they really do throw it away then I would love bala's suggestion above to be put into practice. Perhaps the government could do more to promote this idea.

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            • #7
              The whole concept seems strange to me because we always share our food with others. If there is a big event at my home (or any of the family members homes) and there is leftover food, we always divy it up based on who wants it. There is hardly ever any waste at all. I am shocked that more people do not do this. I could not dream of throwing food away when there are so many hungry people out there who could use it.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by bala View Post
                I am Indian too,and strictly against all this grandeur,but there is way that has been devised to not let the food go waste.All a person needs to do is call up 1008 and representatives will arrive to collect the food left over.This in turn will be used to feed the poor and the needy.

                That is a fantastic scheme and I'm really glad that this happens! I wish this happened all over the world. Here in the UK, there are strict regulations about food which has been out of the refrigerator for a certain length of time. If the food has been out for any longer, no officials will touch it. Of course,t here is nothing stopping individuals from distributing the food privately.

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                • #9
                  I would have liked to reserve my comment since that's not my culture. I'm just sad knowing that parents had to spend for their children's marriage. They could have spent it for their retirement. Maybe because Indians think it's an investment for them. Here in my country, the couple who wanted to be wed are the ones spending for their own wedding. So I guess there's more of a struggle. I am confident, however, that though it will take some time, such extravagant traditions will quietly die down once India becomes more and more industrialized.

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                  • #10
                    People pay for their own weddings for the most part where I live. Parents will help out if they can afford to, but it is much more important for parents to save for the own retirement futures. Parents spend their kids whole childhood years paying for everything and putting them through school, at some point the kids have to start fending for themselves.

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                    • #11
                      Hey bala, I've never heard of that number before. 1008? I'll try it. Could you give some more information as to who these guys are and what do they do? Much appreciated!

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by calicer1996 View Post
                        Hey bala, I've never heard of that number before. 1008? I'll try it. Could you give some more information as to who these guys are and what do they do? Much appreciated!
                        yes.they collect the food that is left over from marriages or parties and give it to the needy.I don't know about the organization founder and stuff like that,but it has been trending in our news feeds and many other information sources.I surely & will happily give the leftovers to these people.After all food is precious and you realize it when u are in dearth.

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                        • #13
                          No, I can't say that I have ever personally had the pleasure to attend a traditional Indian wedding. But I have observed in documentaries and movies that these events can be rather lavish and very involved. I am not too familiar with Indian customs and traditions, but when it comes to wasting food or resources, I feel quite strongly about it. Could the left-over food not be distributed to the homeless or the many beggars in the streets?

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by amethyst View Post
                            No, I can't say that I have ever personally had the pleasure to attend a traditional Indian wedding. But I have observed in documentaries and movies that these events can be rather lavish and very involved. I am not too familiar with Indian customs and traditions, but when it comes to wasting food or resources, I feel quite strongly about it. Could the left-over food not be distributed to the homeless or the many beggars in the streets?
                            Exactly and i feel ashamed to state here that Indian marriages "waste food" and if they can collect from all the marriages over a couple of days,it can even feed the entire malnourished population in Africa,i reckon.
                            it will pain if you see the amount of food being thrown into the dustbin as leftovers.Money,food and everything goes down the drain.

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                            • #15
                              I have not had the opportunity to attend an Indian wedding, so I cannot comment on that. I know the weddings in the US can be unbelievably financially wasteful.

                              When my wife and I were married, we had a very simple, very inexpensive, ceremony in our church. The people in the church helped with the set up and what little expense the was was shared between me, the Mrs, and a little from our parents. My mother-in-law sewed the wedding dress by hand. Other than the religious vows, we did a couple things from our respective cultural backgrounds, danced, and called it good. I have no regrets on how it turned out.
                              "Success is survival." ~ Leonard Cohen

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