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Thousands of Cases of Dengue Fever Reported in Yemen

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  • Thousands of Cases of Dengue Fever Reported in Yemen

    The World Health Organization has recorded more than 3,000 cases of the disease since March 20, while some nongovernmental organizations have recorded more than 6,000 cases. There is no vaccine or treatment for the disease, which causes flu-like symptoms, including high fever, severe headache, nausea and vomiting. Read more at http://www.newsweek.com/thousands-ca...emen-un-346144 In a separate article Newsweek says that Dengue fever may be the world's next public-health threat. Read http://www.newsweek.com/dengue-fever...-threat-216462
    dillinger10 likes this.

  • #2
    That's awful. There is still no antiviral treatments for the disease, and they don't call it break-bone fever for no reason. Yemen is such a sad case. There is so much wealth in that region, but they are well on their way to being a full-fledged failed state.
    Preacherbob50 likes this.

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    • #3
      Yemen is really struggling right now with severe shortages in fuel, water and medicine. The combination of a lack of water and medicine is not a good combination and increases the likelihood of and outbreak spreading further.

      Earlier today I read about the massive increase in dengue fatalities in Malaysia this year. To date, there have been 157 deaths in Malaysia, more than twice the number as compared to this time last year and there have been more than 40,000 cases, an increase of more than 30%. The reason why I post this is because this article in The Malaysian Star reports that officials were expecting a larger number of cases this year due to a a new serotype infecting humans. This surely can't bode well for Yemen either.

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      • #4
        Speaking of Dengue, My nephew just came out if the hospital and recovered from Dengue fever, He missed the first 2 weeks of school because of it. He got saved because of the blood platelets he got from an anonymous donor. People should always drain the stagnant waters in your area. If you see empty bottles with water in it, remove the water. Do not let mosquitoes find a place were they can lay eggs. Mosquitoes loves laying eggs in fresh water.

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        • #5
          Dengue is a killer and I have 2 friends whose kids died of dengue. It's a cruel disease. But do you know that there is a herb that fights dengue? We have that herb in our backyard garden and it was proven to be true in 2 instances. Just this year, a tv actress posted in the social media her need for that herb called TAWA-TAWA. She was in the hospital for 5 days and her platelet count was continuously going down to critical levels. That night, her driver came to our house to get that herb. On the next day, the actress was almost well with the platelet nearing the normal level. On the second day of drinking the herb concoction, she was released from the hospital.
          Matheka likes this.

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          • #6
            @Alexandroy thanks for that piece of information. Could you share more info on that herb? Photos, or web links or any other info you might have. It might prove useful for someone out there.

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            • #7
              Dengue has been a big health threat here in the Philippines until now. That is why our Department of Health has then promoted what they called "The 4 o'clock Habit," which encouraged households to clean their backyards and other surroundings particularly throwing away stagnant water from containers, pots, vases, tires or anything that can harbour mosquitoes.

              I was almost a victim of Dengue myself 13 years ago. We used to go to rural communities to teach about healthcare. We were educating community folks about the disease and its prevention because there have been reports of Dengue cases in their area during that time. After a week of being immersed in the community, I suddenly developed fever, chills, body weakness and rashes came out when they initially did a “Tourniquet Test” on me. They had to immediately rush me to the hospital for further tests and treatment and luckily it turned out I only had a flu.

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              • #8
                It's always so heart wrenching hearing about a disease or infection that currently doesn't have a cure or relieve the symptoms. I believe there is currently something in development in some labs in the Netherlands. At least, that's the impression I got from talking to some colleagues who are working with the Dengue virus. It'd would be difficult to estimate a timeframe on a potential release if that were the case.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Matheka View Post
                  @Alexandroy thanks for that piece of information. Could you share more info on that herb? Photos, or web links or any other info you might have. It might prove useful for someone out there.
                  I think it is safest to say that right now it is an ongoing area of research. One of the issues with dengue is that it can present with a large diversity of symptoms, so any effects of tawa tawa are likely to vary. It is being actively researched by the Philippine Council for Health Research and Development, but so far there is nothing conclusive. The Department of Health in the Philippines released a statement saying the Euphorbia Hirta (tawa tawa) is not enough for critical dengue patients and instead recommends more standard oral hydration therapies.

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                  • #10
                    This is a very dangerous situation. I don't understand how these scientists don't have any cures for these diseases. What are they getting paid for because they're not solving any problems or cures.

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                    • #11
                      This article does a great job of capturing the dire situation in Yemen, reporting that nearly 80 per cent of its population (almost 21 million) are dependent on humanitarian aid for food and water, while six million are believed to be suffering from severe hunger. It's almost unfathomable to think that as many as 20 million people do not have access to potable water.

                      With regards to Dengue fever, the article also makes claims that NGOs believe that as many as 6,000 people may now be infected with the disease. The Daily Sabah believes the situation to be even worse, reporting that 8.036 are currently suffering from Dengue fever while 586 people have died.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Matheka View Post
                        @Alexandroy thanks for that piece of information. Could you share more info on that herb? Photos, or web links or any other info you might have. It might prove useful for someone out there.
                        The department of health is not acknowledging the Tawa-tawa herb although most doctors I have talked to endorse it. In fact, my nephew was hit by dengue 2 months ago, his mother is a nurse and father is a doctor. They called me up for the herb since the platelet count continued to go down. On the next morning, I was there with a bunch of that herb and one day after, they had a platelet count that looked good. So in my experience, tawa-tawa can certainly cure dengue.

                        I am attaching is the photo of Tawa-tawa in our backyard planter box.

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Alexandoy View Post

                          The department of health is not acknowledging the Tawa-tawa herb although most doctors I have talked to endorse it. In fact, my nephew was hit by dengue 2 months ago, his mother is a nurse and father is a doctor. They called me up for the herb since the platelet count continued to go down. On the next morning, I was there with a bunch of that herb and one day after, they had a platelet count that looked good. So in my experience, tawa-tawa can certainly cure dengue.

                          I am attaching is the photo of Tawa-tawa in our backyard planter box.
                          Are there any risks? Even if the health department isn't recognizing it as a treatment, if its worked in the past what will it hurt to try it? There are a lot of remedies that isn't officially recognized, but I've tried and they worked. I would take Alexandoy word for it if he's witnessed it work, regardless of what the health department said.

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                          • #14
                            The latest news courtesy of The UN paints a very bleak picture. Dengue fever continues to rise in Yemen. Local authorities in Aden have reported 8,036 cases to date (double the number reported two weeks ago) and 586 deaths (five times the number reported two weeks ago). Based on these numbers, it would appear that there are an average of 150 new cases of dengue fever being diagnosed every day, with 11 deaths daily. That is a staggering number of people and too many for Yemen's health care system to accommodate.

                            Making matters even worse are reports concerning a high risk of a polio outbreak and the fact that thousands of people suffering from chronic life-threatening diseases are dying due to the deteriorating health system. Yemen's health care system is in really bad shape with the WHO suggesting that it is on the brink of collapse which means identifying and treating health issues, including dengue, is likely to result in a higher than usual number of fatalities. This is just an all around bad situation.
                            Last edited by dillinger10; 07-01-2015, 12:38 AM.
                            Preacherbob50 likes this.

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                            • #15
                              Dengue is a very deadly disease in many third world and developing countries like mine. Usually, it is during the rainy season that cases of dengue rise. This is because mosquitoes lay their eggs in stagnant water.

                              To prevent the spread of dengue, make sure that your surroundings are clean. Get rid of any stagnant water around your area. Make sure children wear long pants or pajamas when playing outside. Use insect repellant lotions when going out. Be wary of the symptoms of dengue: on and off fever, vomiting and feeling tired.

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