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Chernobyl all over again ?

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  • #16
    There must be people that are living in the area now, since the Chernobyl disaster was a long time ago. I have to wonder how these poor people are being affected by this and if they can be assisted. As previously discussed, this does have far reaching affects, no only for those who are in the vicinity, but also the animals and environment. It would be interesting to know just how far this could be carried by the wind.

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    • #17
      Where are those people who claim that nuclear power does not cause pollution ? The disaster happened almost 30 years ago and we are still facing the consequences, the Japanese nuclear disaster will continue to affect us for god knows how many more years. Also as nuclear power plants are getting older, they are probably becoming more unsafe. There should be a world moritoriam on building more nuclear power plants.

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      • #18
        We have a mothballed nuclear plant in the town of Morong, province of Rizal in the northern part of the Philippines. There is a plan to use this nuclear plant for power supply. But so many are against it. In fact, it has not been used even once except for the demo operation. If it can be used today, it can greatly alleviate the lack of power supply of the country.

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        • #19
          That radioactive pollution still flows to a lot of places because of the underground water streams under the nuclear station. So i'd say this disaster is clearly affecting Pripyat, Chernobyl and places around them. However, I'd love to visit and explore this place someday.

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          • #20
            Originally posted by Arvis View Post
            That radioactive pollution still flows to a lot of places because of the underground water streams under the nuclear station. So i'd say this disaster is clearly affecting Pripyat, Chernobyl and places around them. However, I'd love to visit and explore this place someday.
            Absolutely,actually that is the path and the one that spreads across miles very easily.Water being a miscible liquid,these materials can even have a streamline flow than a turbulent flow over the path.
            Why do you want to explore it btw.? do you want to observe the traces ?

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            • #21
              It's an abandoned environment, which used to be full of life, now almost untouched by human for years. This already sounds good enough reason to see how it all looks and how nature has taken over the city. The only thing I would be worried about is radiation risks. I've heard there are some guards which don't let you go anywhere, but they are quite easy to bribe.

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              • #22
                On a level-headed thinking, which is more evil, nuclear power or oil-fueled power generators? The nuclear plant poses a danger when it explodes but the oil-fueled power generators generate pollution that ruins the ozone layer. So, take your pick.

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                • #23
                  I didn't have a clue that the fire could actually make the poison come back again. I was just reading this article and it's impressive how this plague simply continues there!

                  'Each fire around Chernobyl re-mobilizes poison'

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                  • #24
                    Who is afraid of a nuclear plant leak? They say that life is a dangerous undertaking and we never get out of it alive. So why worry of another Chernobyl? Let's enjoy life and look at tragedies and disasters as a challenge for our creativity and innovation. We have a nuclear plant here in the Philippines that was built in the 1970s and hadn't been used. What a waste of resources.

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                    • #25
                      Originally posted by Alexandoy View Post
                      Who is afraid of a nuclear plant leak? They say that life is a dangerous undertaking and we never get out of it alive. So why worry of another Chernobyl? Let's enjoy life and look at tragedies and disasters as a challenge for our creativity and innovation. We have a nuclear plant here in the Philippines that was built in the 1970s and hadn't been used. What a waste of resources.
                      People should be afraid of a nuclear plant leak !
                      The radiation can cause serious damage to both plant and animal life, as well as humans and fishes, and other sea creatures.
                      Reports are coming out about butterflies in Japan that are mutations, and their bodies and wings are not right. Flowers are growing deformed blossoms. Starfish are dying by the thousands from the radiation that has leaked into the ocean near the Fukushima plant.
                      One of the worst problems is that when many of the older nuclear power plants were built, they were not adequate to withstand natural disasters , such as earthquakes and tsunami's ; and neither are the storage facilities where the spent fuel is stored.
                      We have some that are leaking here in the United States, but the subject is not brought up very often. Some of these are located near earthquake faults; so if there should be a quake in the vicinity; then much damage and contamination would occur.

                      We owe it to ourselves, our children, and this planet, to try and take care of the earth, and not contaminate it . There are other safer methods of energy available. Solar energy is abundant, it just needs to be developed, as an example.
                      People can live in harmony with this earth.
                      Consider the Earthship. They are constructed out of recycled materials, and have solar heating and energy, water-filtration systems, and everything that a person needs to live self-sufficiently, and nothing is polluting our planet.
                      Solar can be used anywhere. It just would be harder for the giant fuel corporations to make so much money from solar, since people could generate their own, and not have to buy it. Obviously, the big business do not like that idea.

                      http://www.robertschoch.net/Radiatio...20Isotopes.htm
                      Diane Lane likes this.

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                      • #26
                        Radioactive elements take several years to get degraded. I don't know if the radioactive dust that flew into the atmosphere in the surrounding areas of Chernobyl has been deactivated enough. Just as they use chemicals to dilute an oil slick on seashores, they would've done something to contain the radioactive dust. It's almost 30 years since the tragedy took place, I hope the dust is naturally neutralized.
                        Diane Lane likes this.

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                        • #27
                          There is a new actively raging fire in the Ukraine, and it is in the same area that was burning near Chernobyl earlier this spring.
                          This fire has definitely affected the radiation, and in some places it is over ten times the safe amount to be in the air.
                          The fire is not that far away from Kiev; which is the capitol of Ukraine.
                          Hopefully, they can get this fire put out and stop it before any more of the radiation from Chernobyl is spread into any populatied areas nearby.

                          http://rt.com/news/271081-chernobyl-...ation-ukraine/
                          Diane Lane likes this.

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                          • #28
                            The only possible up side to this that I can think of is that scientists can learn from the mistakes of the past, and from this new fire, and hopefully will be able to come up with a way to handle future fires and/or any other incidents in the area. Also, lessons learned in dealing with the past and current Chernobyl issues could hopefully help with plans for how to manage potential issues in Fukushima.

                            I had read that before about the elderly former residents returning, to live out the rest of their lives. It is a pretty strong statement about the draw of a place and the sense of community that they had, prior to the explosion, that they would even want to go back to a location where something like that happened.
                            Bonzer likes this.

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