Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Bracing The Storm Study

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Bracing The Storm Study

    A group called the SmarterSafer Coalition did a study called Bracing the Storm and in their study they discovered that though disaster relief programs work hard in planning and allocating funds for disaster relief they come up short.

    Originally posted by The Hill
    They find that consumer safety and pocket books were put at risk too many times for too long. Scores of Federal, state, and local government agencies operate courageously on the front lines to recover our communities from disasters, and in back rooms they to plan and coordinate those recovery efforts. Unfortunately the planning is often ineffective and the spending misallocated.
    Disaster relief organizations spend billions of dollars per year in disaster relief efforts but these attempts appear to be ineffective. Why? Because the funds are being
    spent post disaster rather then being allocated to predisaster methods.

    Originally posted by The Hill
    The most efficient and effective use of our resources is to mitigate the human and infrastructure exposures before any disaster. Each $1 spent on mitigation reduced the post-disaster spending by $4 to $5. Yet perversely, less than 0.4 percent of total spending is devoted to mitigation, while 99.6 percent is spent on disaster recovery.
    The most efficient and effective use of our resources is to mitigate the human and infrastructure exposures before any disaster.
    Where there is an beginning, there is an end.
    Where there is an end, there is a new beginning.

  • #2
    You're exactly right about that. Things have to be done before hand and not after the fact. It's like you're spinning your wheels and going no where fast. We only can do so much anyway as mother nature tends to do what and how she pleases.

    Comment


    • #3
      The first step is education. People should be educated on disasters and emergency management. Start with the kids like the Pillow Case Project the Red Cross and Disney are doing. Make it a whole class and not a brief amount of time. Educate the kids on different disasters and what to do in case of one. Another thing is to ban the purchase of certain areas that are disaster prone or find methods to make it safer before people set up housing there. Like, why would you sell or purchase property right by a fault line like they do in California. That is a disaster just waiting to happen and it has on many occasions. The area near the fault line should have been made into unsellable BLM land or something.
      Where there is an beginning, there is an end.
      Where there is an end, there is a new beginning.

      Comment


      • #4
        It comes down to that old adage, "Prevention is better than the cure". Surely it would be more sensible to take steps to reduce the chance of a similar disaster recurring.

        KimberlyD couldn't agree more about the properties on fault lines. Why indeed! Here in the UK, we have a problem with coastal erosion yet people still purchase beach front properties then act surprised by when they find out that they are in imminent danger.

        Comment


        • #5
          I believe the saying is "An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure". I never understood why people insist on buying homes in places where there is known disasters. Do they NOT research before the buy? If you tell me, we get frequent violent earthquakes.... you would not get a chance to turn around before I'm out the door. I would never buy a home where there are disasters. I moved to Nevada where the worst things I have to worry about are dust devils and the occasional minor flash flood. Even with my friends and family, I ask them "What research did you do?". If they did not check for disaster statistics, I look it up for them. I don't play around when it comes to these kinds of things.
          Where there is an beginning, there is an end.
          Where there is an end, there is a new beginning.

          Comment


          • #6
            You know, this is one disaster that I would like to have a drill. That earthquake drill is silly because if you would care to look at the statistics, storms come more often than earthquakes. Although the quake is more disastrous, there are times that storms have more casualties. So I think the government should think this angle of holding a storm or typhoon drill - no electricity, no water, no roads due to flood.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by Alexandoy View Post
              You know, this is one disaster that I would like to have a drill. That earthquake drill is silly because if you would care to look at the statistics, storms come more often than earthquakes. Although the quake is more disastrous, there are times that storms have more casualties. So I think the government should think this angle of holding a storm or typhoon drill - no electricity, no water, no roads due to flood.
              The problem with that is they have done studies that concluded that the drilling that we are currently doing is causing an increase in earthquake activity. Catch 22 situation here. Best to just come up with a better way to build homes and such to withstand storms and earthquakes.
              Where there is an beginning, there is an end.
              Where there is an end, there is a new beginning.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by KimberlyD View Post
                A group called the SmarterSafer Coalition did a study called Bracing the Storm and in their study they discovered that though disaster relief programs work hard in planning and allocating funds for disaster relief they come up short.

                Disaster relief organizations spend billions of dollars per year in disaster relief efforts but these attempts appear to be ineffective. Why? Because the funds are being
                spent post disaster rather then being allocated to predisaster methods.

                You hit the nail on the head - disaster relief come up short. From what I see in the local scene, and I already had mentioned this another thread, the leaders of the rescue or relief team has other things in their mind. Obviously, they look at the relief activity as work and not as charitable action. There were so many instances that relief team leaders would be bickering on the method of distribution, each one wanting to get sole credit for giving relief goods that came from donations. Secondly is the inside job looting done by the distributors themselves.

                I am really sorry for posting negative thougths on the matter. I just want the world to know the kind of disaster relief we have here in this part of the world.

                Comment


                • #9
                  There are some disaster relief programs that genuinely want to help, but the larger relief organizations take over and botch it all up. I think that there should be more concentration on preventive solutions then relief solutions. If the levees were replaced in New Orleans then there would not have been an issue etc etc... there are so many things that can be done to prevent disasters that relief efforts would not be so much needed as they are now.
                  Where there is an beginning, there is an end.
                  Where there is an end, there is a new beginning.

                  Comment

                  Working...
                  X