Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Social Media & Emergency Management

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Social Media & Emergency Management

    The following video covers social media in emergency management. It discusses the dissemination of information, and dispelling misinformation, in an age of pervasive social media. The video is presented by Bill Boyd, who is a fire chief and incident commander.

    IrishHeather, iamshane487 and 3 others like this.
    "Success is survival." ~ Leonard Cohen

  • #2
    Good video. Thanks for sharing that.

    If anyone is interested in the 3 hour FEMA course on this topic, check out their IS-42 class.
    iamshane487, Diane Lane and ASurvivor like this.

    Comment


    • #3
      Now that is useful. Social media is prone to scaremongering so it's good to understand what information needs to be shared and how it should be presented, without causing mass hysteria.
      iamshane487 likes this.

      Comment


      • #4
        Exactly my point too. The way people are using social media these days is quite disappointing. Instead of using social media to excessively promote moments of vanity, it would be better to use SNS as a platform to share important and life-changing pieces of information such as how to prepare for emergencies or health tips.


        iamshane487 likes this.

        Comment


        • #5
          Social media can be put up a scare or two,and its people who should give it a thought before they take it into their brains.A hysteria,in mass elements can wreak havoc in short span,and there are people who do this wantedly to create hype/havoc.
          iamshane487 likes this.

          Comment


          • #6
            I don't work in emergency response, but I do live in an area that is somewhat isolated. It can be very difficult to determine what is going on here, because our responders are not the ones closest in proximity to the neighborhood. I do miss being able to listen in on scanner apps to see what is being done, why there are sirens approaching, etc., but we have formed a Facebook group, as well as a group on nextdoor.com, so at least we can discuss what is going on among ourselves, and, since many here are longtime residents, they have connections with responders, and city and county officials, so can provide us with information.

            I'm glad to see that in the video, he is interested in addressing the issue. It seems some try to ignore it, but the internet and social media are not going away, and agencies, responders, government officials, and the news media, need to formulate emergency plans, as well as information dissemination tactics now, as well as practicing drills, in order to facilitate the flow of information, and increase chances of survival for those within the purview of their responsibility.
            iamshane487 likes this.

            Comment


            • #7
              I agree as well. Getting the news out can be great as social media has a large platform for it. There is so much spam and none sense on social media though, making it hard to believe what is real and what's fake. Emergency responses should be added and have an alert system with it, letting people know what's real and what's happening.
              Diane Lane and iamshane487 like this.

              Comment


              • #8
                There is various false news in social media in which we call spam. I just seldom access my account there because of this issue and the nonsense advertisements, as well as posts keep showing in my newsfeed. This one is great to make sense in practicing social media accounts. This is accommodating to become alert when there is a frightening incident.
                Diane Lane likes this.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by mairj23 View Post
                  I agree as well. Getting the news out can be great as social media has a large platform for it. There is so much spam and none sense on social media though, making it hard to believe what is real and what's fake. Emergency responses should be added and have an alert system with it, letting people know what's real and what's happening.

                  u talking about the TRP's for these channels and the Popularity score for these social media pages.?
                  To curb all these,i should say we better google it up with a few other sources befoer actually ascertaining on the credibility of the news/article.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    There is a flip side to social media in the case of a disaster. It can be used as a way to call for help. There were several incidences (This is the only one that comes to mind right this second Girl Saves Dad Using Facebook ) where social media can save a life. Now the problems he mentioned about social media are true... people put the craziest stuff and cause lots of problems and misinformation. That is why many services have social media accounts themselves to correct the incorrect information and to report the truth.
                    Where there is an beginning, there is an end.
                    Where there is an end, there is a new beginning.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by iamshane487 View Post
                      There is various false news in social media in which we call spam. I just seldom access my account there because of this issue and the nonsense advertisements, as well as posts keep showing in my newsfeed. This one is great to make sense in practicing social media accounts. This is accommodating to become alert when there is a frightening incident.

                      I do use social media as my main source for news, and I've learned to go straight to the accounts of my local news stations, or those in whatever city/area I'm interested in hearing about, specifically because of the spam you mentioned. One account I've been following for a long time on Twitter, that has police and emergency news, as well as some filler stories in between that are usually informative or sometimes even amusing, is @pzfeed. I'm not affiliated with the account, I'm just sharing so you and others can check it out. He/they cover stories from all over, not just the U.S., and a good way to find other legitimate accounts to follow is when you go to the verified news accounts, go to the list of accounts that they follow, and see who they retweet. That way, you can pick up the reporters, as well as other verified news and emergency-type accounts to follow. I hope this helps!

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        I just came across this article that talks about how social media can save lives during a disaster. They are mainly focusing on Twitter maps but it is interesting to read. What are your thoughts on this article? I think that social media (as with anything in the world) can be used for good as well as bad. Social media is useful in spreading information on emergency management but on the flip side it is also a good way to spread false information as the guy in the video stated.
                        They may not provide comprehensive information, but they can help save lives.
                        Where there is an beginning, there is an end.
                        Where there is an end, there is a new beginning.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by KimberlyD View Post
                          I just came across this article that talks about how social media can save lives during a disaster. They are mainly focusing on Twitter maps but it is interesting to read. What are your thoughts on this article? I think that social media (as with anything in the world) can be used for good as well as bad. Social media is useful in spreading information on emergency management but on the flip side it is also a good way to spread false information as the guy in the video stated.
                          A real time flood map to assess the location and depth of the flood waters.Its absolutely brilliant to plot a water motion data and elevation stats.Numb actually,the level the technology has transcended.just brilliant.
                          Actually the cynosure was the selfie.That really hogged the limelight of this article. :P

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Sadly, social media is 100% dependent on infrastructure that is prone to failure, shutdown or outage in the early, most needed, times. Cell towers and their associated electronics are quickly overloaded, if not damaged or run out of emergency fuel, in times of disaster. Even with limited damage, the infrastructure can only be supported in "emergency mode" while access to fuel and electrical power is available. Bandwidth and quality of service are almost always throttled back to "max up time" of the available resources, which in itself will slow things down.

                            Longer term events will find that the infrastructure may not return to service as promptly as the public or Emergency Management team would have the public believe. Even charging devices will be problematic with power mains down. 4 hours of use, perhaps 6 for your devices.

                            It is, again, false security to pin your hopes on as fragile technology as Social Media, in times of need. You would be better served to get your ham radio license and prepare with the myriad options available there. Dependence on the Gov't has been proven to NOT be as responsive as victims, and their perceived needs, would want.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Social media is only going to be of any use at all if it can actually be accessed. Factors such as hacking, internet connection failure or power cuts could render it completely useless so we shouldn't rely on this as our primary or only form of communication.

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X