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Hurricane Preparedness: Why hurricane preparation should start now

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  • #16
    Great post. I'll have to check out some of those links when I get a little extra spare time. I personally have experienced a hurricane. I was on a family vacation in the late 1990's and had to evacuate Hilton Head Island, SC. The traffic was ridiculous and it took hours and hours to get off the island. Definitely wasn't a very prepared area for a hurricane.

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    • #17
      I think it would be difficult to get through the traffic situation, especially with little time on your hands. I have anxiety and I would totally not be able to live in an area where you had to evacuate if something like that were to happen. Of course, there are hurricanes that may happen where I live, but I've never heard of one in this area so I think I'll be fine. Mother Nature does not mess around!

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      • #18
        We've really had a quiet hurricane season this year. I hope that this doesn't lull people into a sense of complacency. We need to remain vigilant and prepared for hurricanes. Unfortunately it seems like people only recognize the need to be prepared AFTER a disaster takes place. Over time people forget and become complacent once again.

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        • #19
          I live in North Carolina, so I know a lot about Hurricane Preparedness. Even so, this list proves that there is always more to learn. The part about helping elderly neighbors reminds me of how hard it is to get grandma moving during a storm. She gets around fine, but she sure takes her sweet time doing it.

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          • #20
            Being a Florida resident, I've learned to keep supplies year round. After hurricane season we are still at risk for tornadoes, though they are generally weak. The start of hurricane season(June) is a great time to make sure the supplies are okay, refresh the battery cache among other things.

            Disasters are much easier to deal with when one has a plan and disaster supplies.

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            • #21
              I have a lot of respect for those of you who live on the east coast as the summer months seem to be wild with activity there. I have never been through a hurricane and hope that I never do. They are wild events from what I have seen on the news and can take out everything that you own in a matter of minutes. I know that people board up their windows when one is expected, but what are some of the other ways you save your home?

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              • #22
                Originally posted by valiantx View Post
                Yeah, because the organization known as FEMA, was such a great help to the "hurricane Katrina" victims in New Orleans a few years ago; yeah, real big help they were then. Also, FEMA is merely a "mental concept" held in belief by humans, it will always take a man or woman, to help another man or woman in the end!
                Katrina caused so many problems to New Orleans because the city is below sea level and lies on a major river. The storm did not even make a direct hit on the city, Mississippi got it and it was less intense than Camile. The levy did not even breach until after the winds were waning because there was a lag time for the surge to run up the Mississippi.

                The residents who failed to heed to the warnings and have a plan for the big one. The city is still vulnerable and it is likely that another major storm will cause significant flooding to the city again within our lifetimes.

                As someone who has been through a few hurricanes, I can say FEMA can be a great help.

                PS.

                The hurricane season does not end until November 30th officially. Wilma was a late season hurricane that did extensive damage to Florida.

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                • #23
                  Thanks for linking to these resources. A few of my family members moved from Los Angeles to Florida and they are not prepared at all! I will be forwarding these to them. The only things we have to worry about are the drought and earthquakes! I wonder if they have insurance for this? Here in CA we have earthquake insurance.

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                  • #24
                    Really good forum, a lot of good resources and links. Thanks so much for this, even though I've never been in a hurricane it's good to be well-informed. Let's hope that this won't get lost in the forum and people will actually pay attention to it.

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                    • #25
                      Chris, your information is relevant to All disasters. Thank you for giving the information. I've made it through 1 Blizzard ( Blizzard of '77 Buffalo, NY ) & 1 Snow Storm ( Atlanta,Ga 2013) I think when you have lived through a disaster it's hard to neglect your advise. Buffalo is familiar with Blizzards once winter comes stocking up on food, personal items, keeping car filled with gas is the norm, but the Blizzard of '77 was more fierce no visibility, temperatures below 0, people unable to open their doors due to mounds of snow, streets frozen ice hanging from houses cars, No Utilities EVERYTHING closed but my friends & I didn't care, NO SCHOOL. Atlanta's snow was cute the entire city shut down people slept in their cars some for days, The entire city was blacked out, cars parked every where, people coming out of the darkness & wooded areas. My husband & I stayed in his office watched the President speak on the laptop our daughter walked home from school. We decided to leave about 11m ( we live 20mins from his office) We knew how to drive snow we passed by & saw all the distress
                      Difference between Buffalo Disaster & Atlanta " Preparation" Atlanta was warned. The choice was to ignore & leave $2.5 million worth of equipment in the garage
                      Clipper

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                      • #26
                        The best thing to do when a hurricane is coming is to leave. A good escape route is essential in saving time and avoiding huge amounts of time in traffic.

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                        • #27
                          Here in Florida, we always start ahead of time. You must prepare yourself for what may come. bottled water, batteries, and canned food should be in stock, before the season beings. It's better to be safe, than sorry.

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                          • #28
                            Very nice resources. We don't get a lot of hurricanes on our side of the US but it pay to be prepared, or at least be familiar with the preparations. It's not like these measures are exclusively for hurricanes either. You can easily tailor these resources for other types of disaster preparedness. I've been caught by a couple of typhoons and cyclones overseas as well, so you never know when you might need the knowledge.

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