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Extreme Heat: An Introductory Guide To Surviving Hot Weather

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  • Extreme Heat: An Introductory Guide To Surviving Hot Weather

    This is a short, introductory guide to coping with extremely hot weather.

    The Center for Disease Control (CDC) defines extreme heat as "summertime temperatures that are substantially hotter and/or more humid than...

    Click here to view the article.
    Live your dream, don't dream your life.
    Chris L-S, CEO/Owner/Administrator, Disaster.Com

  • #2
    Humidity is a big threat. I hate seeing kids out training in sports when it's in th upper 90s, but here the air is so dry your skin gets itchy if you forget lotion even one day. I can't imagine how people survive in high humidity. I hope the coaches are aware of the risks and take precautions, like maybe hose the kids off periodically to keep them cool.
    Diane Lane likes this.

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    • #3
      We have all been told that too much salt is bad for us, and especially those of us who are seniors, we are often told to cut down on our salt intake.
      Seniors are also the ones most prone to heat exhaustion and heat stroke, although it can happen to anyone when you get dehydrated.
      The first thing that they will do to treat you if this happens is to give you an IV with a saline solution. We need salt, and even more so in hot weather when we lose salt through perspiration.

      The next question that is important, is what kind of salt and how much. Plain household salt has been chemically refined and treated, so it is basically a non-food anymore, and even with the added iodine, it is still unhealthy for us. Choose a natural salt, either sea salt, or a mineral salt, which has the natural minerals still in it.
      My choice was the Himalayan mineral salt. It comes from the Jurassic time period oceans, and the beautiful pink color is from minerals that leached into the salt over thousands of years.
      I got mine from Amazon, and it is beautiful (almost jewel-like) pink crystals. I put some in the salt grinder for use on food, and a small jar of the crystals to add to soups and other things where they will dissolve in the water when they are cooking.

      Salt holds water in our bodies and keeps us from being dehydrated. We need a balance of water and salt, not too much of either, but enough to keep us hydrated during the heat.
      So, get yourself some healthy salt, and use it knowing that it is good for your body, and not bad unless overdone. Actually, my Himalayan salt has a saltier flavor than plain salt, and it only takes a little to add a delightful salty taste to your food.

      http://www.waterbenefitshealth.com/water-and-salt.html
      Diane Lane likes this.

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      • #4
        I am glad that summer is almost over and the extreme heat is dissipating even if somehow slowly. The temperature at 30 deg is tolerable but when the sun is up and it hovers at 35 deg before going up some more, you risk dehydration or worse, heatstroke, unless you go to a shaded area. Our living room has an air conditioning for the benefit of our dogs. Extreme heat can also cause heat stroke to dogs. Our thermometer is a guide when to turn on the airconditioning - if the temperature hits 30 degrees.

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        • #5
          I live in a tropical country which is generally hot throughout the year, and it's even worse during the summer season. This summer, temperatures ranged from 37 up to 42 degrees centigrade so the whole summer has been so hot to bear. I myself am hypertensive and I find it hard to breath sometimes when the temperature is so high. The statement in the article saying that electric or cooling fans are not enough is so true. Even the air that blows from these fans are so hot. My intake of water has fairly increased and I would always feel so thirsty, I feel weak whenever I feel I don't have enough water in my body.

          I would just like to share a personal story of a friend of mine who unknowingly left her 4-year-old daughter inside her car. They were a lot in the car that time and she didn't realize that her daughter was left behind when they all left the car. It was around 1 pm and the temperature has always been so hot during that time. It took a few minutes before she realized that her daughter was still in the car. When she went back to the car to check on her daughter, she was all red and was struggling to breath. She was immediately rushed to the nearest hospital and luckily she became alright. A lesson of never leaving children in the car during hot weather.

          Regarding heat stroke, a colleague of mine died due to that. She was busy driving back and forth from one area to another on a hot and humid day and she had her car windows open during her driving. When she arrived at her last destination, she suddenly collapsed and was rushed to the hospital. Unfortunately, she was declared dead on arrival upon arriving in the emergency room. The doctors said she was severely dehydrated and suffered heat stroke. This emphasizes the importance of never forgetting water intake no matter how busy you are especially when the weather is very hot.

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          • #6
            Living in the Sacramento area, this is an extremely important read for me. I know I'm going to send this to some friends who may not be so great at taking care of their bodies or reading the signs in such intense heat. It's really frustrating to me when I see people playing outside in 100+ degrees all day without drinking an excess amount of water- the body doesn't want to operate in those conditions without being constantly hydrated! There are so many areas of the world that are essentially unfit for humans unless they have constant access to drinking water, which some people take for granted. Construction workers, for example, wouldn't be able to do work during the summer months in a lot of places without access to clean water.
            Diane Lane and ASurvivor like this.

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            • #7
              It's the end of summer here in the Philippines and it is still so hot. Extreme heat is still on the country yet rainy season is starting. This is one thing that changed - the heat. Global warming is already on this planet and it is caused by the people themselves. Climate changes due to human activities. This article helps a lot, What I am doing that is stated on the article is taking shower to reduce the body heat. Thanks a lot admin.

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              • #8
                One really easy way to help keep yourself cool when working out in the yard , is to get a small pool to cool off in. Even a small kiddie pool will help and it will not use as much water as taking a cool shower does. I used this a lot in the summertime to help keep cool in the heat.
                I would do some of my yard work, and then go and lie in the pool for a few minutes, and get my hair good and wet as well.
                I kept the little pool in a shady area of the yard; so it stayed as cool as possible in the heat, and then just added a little more cold water from the hose as needed.
                Even better is one of those Intex pools that you can actually swim in; but those are not always a do-able thing unless you have your own house and yard to set one up in.
                Just the little wading pool does not take up as much room , and it really helps to keep you cool.
                Another good thing for the summer is called a "cool-tie". It is like a bandana, but it has a kind of gel inside it that keeps your neck cool. You soak the bandana in water for an hour and then it has absorbed the water and is very cooling on your neck.
                Just keeping the back of your neck cool in hot weather really helps a whole lot. I like having a couple of them, that way you can wear one, and have the other one chilling in a pan of cold water.
                Diane Lane likes this.

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                • #9
                  The article was informative and helpful. Nonetheless, I would like to add a few more points. Flushing out the temperature from the body is most important. The body does it naturally, but when the heat is too much for its capacity it loses the ability to send out excess heat and the same gets trapped inside the body, leading to a sun stroke.

                  Sponging with cold water to a heat-affected person is of great importance. It removes the excess temperature and resumes normal bodily functions. If an air-conditioner is not available, the patient should be placed where plenty of air is circulated. This measure reduces ambient relative humidity. Regular administration of ORS saves lives.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Bonzer View Post
                    The article was informative and helpful. Nonetheless, I would like to add a few more points. Flushing out the temperature from the body is most important. The body does it naturally, but when the heat is too much for its capacity it loses the ability to send out excess heat and the same gets trapped inside the body, leading to a sun stroke.

                    Sponging with cold water to a heat-affected person is of great importance. It removes the excess temperature and resumes normal bodily functions. If an air-conditioner is not available, the patient should be placed where plenty of air is circulated. This measure reduces ambient relative humidity. Regular administration of ORS saves lives.
                    I just got home from a brief vacation in the province of Batanes, the northern tip of the Philippines. I never expected that it was too hot there during this summer time. The temperature was probably soaring to the 35s or higher and my thirst seemed not to be quenched anymore. Making matters worse, the hotel has poor airconditioning and power outages were a common occurrence. It was really a bad experience with the hot climate.

                    To counter the extreme heat, I slept with only my underwear at night since the electric fan was having a hard time. In the daytime, I have the frozen bottle of water that I touch my face with to console my skin somehow. But the worst is when we go to the mountains as part of the packaged tour. The sun was shining brightly and there was no way to avoid it so I had to apply sunblock lotion. Tsk, tsk, terrible indeed.

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                    • #11
                      Extreme heat can cause a lot of harmful things. It can trigger your blood pressure that can lead to death therefore it really is important to keep our body cool and hydrated. Always have a bottle of water with you and don't expose yourself to too much sun especially during noontime. It is also essential to change your clothes into something that is very light and comfortable.

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                      • #12
                        That's a really good guide. I think that I'm one of those people that absolutely hate the heat due to it burning my skin and making me feel irritated and unhappy with humid, I've seen it also cause fire and all, it's not a good situation at all. I absolutely miss winter and snow and the coldness.

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                        • #13
                          I always drink a lot of water these days to keep my self hydrated. I sweat a lot even if I am not working out. Summer is suppose to be over on my location but iis humid here even when it's raining. Your salt advice reminds me a lot why people loves swimming in the ocean. There is something calming about ocean water.


                          I wish I have a pool so the water can help me cool down from this crazy temperature. I My body is currently covered with prickly heat because of the temperature.

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                          • #14
                            People who are on certain medications need to take extra precautions in extreme temperatures. If you are not certain whether yours is amongst them then do check it out today and make sure you know what you need to do.
                            Diane Lane likes this.

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                            • #15
                              The number one victim of extreme heat are the asthmatics. They have no shield against sweat unless they are in an air conditioned room. The next victims are those with heart ailments. They easily succumb to fatigue and later on can have a heart attack. Third are those with weak physique that can suffer heat stroke. There was this former governor who was running for re-election in the province of Batangas. In one of his campaign trip to a town, he suffered heat stroke and died. Elections here are held in May, it's summer time.

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