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The Winter Storm: Preparing for and Surviving a Blizzard

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  • The Winter Storm: Preparing for and Surviving a Blizzard

    This is a guide to preparing for and surviving a blizzard.

    A blizzard is an extreme form of winter storm. *It is categorized by massive snowfall and sustained winds of at...

    Click here to view the article.
    Live your dream, don't dream your life.
    Chris L-S, CEO/Owner/Administrator, Disaster.Com

  • #2
    Good advice. Winter storms can be scary. If you're caught unprepared, things get hectic in a hurry.

    I hate getting out during a winter storm, but if I have to, I try to take care with that as well. I see so many people go out who aren't dressed for it. Living in the country, most things are not nearby. If their car breaks down or they get stuck, they will be in trouble.

    I get laughed at for dressing like an Eskimo for a 20 minute car trip, but I don't care. That 20 minute trip ends up being WAY longer (not to mention colder) if you end up on foot and you're in a hoodie instead of a coat, with no gloves. I'd rather be laughed at than be frozen.
    fcphdJim likes this.

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    • #3
      Thankfully, I haven't had to deal with snow blizzards and winter storms for many years now. But in the past, when I worked in the Austrian Alps, I experienced some severe weather conditions where I got snowed in for many weeks without being able to escape the "white inferno" as I used to call it. Once, during a cross country skiing trip, I got trapped in a sudden storm and lost my orientation. I was pelted by snow and ice for hours .At that time I thought my life was coming to an end, but luckily I was rescued by a local man who happened to see me disappear down the river bank.
      In my experience, the best way to stay safe during a snow storm is to stay indoors or seek shelter as soon as the weather changes. And if you are somewhere out in the country, far away from town, as I was, then don't hesitate to call for help immediately!

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      • #4
        That was a really good article but I would add a section for entertainment. You never know how long you might be cooped up and you may or may not have power for the duration. Board games, books, cards, and puzzle books can be some great ways to combat boredom that you don't have to have power to do.

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        • #5
          That is a good point, Ally79. Cabin fever is a very real thing. In fact, combatting said would make an interesting topic.
          ally79 likes this.
          "Success is survival." ~ Leonard Cohen

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          • #6
            I agree - an article on what to have on hand to keep yourself entertained in the days/weeks after a disaster..

            I was looking at survival kits on Amazon and one of them contained several decks of cards and soccer balls.
            ally79 likes this.
            Live your dream, don't dream your life.
            Chris L-S, CEO/Owner/Administrator, Disaster.Com

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            • #7
              I would actually be happy to write an article like that for you guys. I try to make it a point to keep things on hand to keep my kids entertained no matter what kind of situation we might have from winter storm to a simple power outage. There are so many inexpensive ways that you can keep the family entertained no matter what ages you have and most people forget that aspect of survival and disasters.

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              • #8
                I live in Oregon where winter storms usually consist of heavy rain. This wide range of snow falling in the east sounds just awful on everyone effected by it. Here in Oregon if it snows just .25 - .5 inches, the schools and roads pretty much shut down. This is mainly due to the fact that not many people can safely drive in snow or know how to. If it's icy out, that's another factor to consider, not to mention most of our work is put on hold if we can't get in.

                I live about 20 miles from where I work but fortunately have the option to work at home, assuming internet access isn't effected by the storm. It would be nice to have said items on hand and available at all times of the year. I know getting to the store right before a storm hits can be hectic in itself.

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                • #9
                  I find that when people hear about a huge winter storm coming they panic a lot more than they should. Living up north, I've been through a lot of huge storms. We've had an ice storm one year that left us without power for several days and we weren't necessarily 'prepared' for it but we were completely fine. People tend to freak out and go stock up on a bunch of stuff and it all ends up being for nothing. As long as you have candles, a flashlight, blankets, food that doesn't require microwaves and whatnot you'll be fine!
                  fcphdJim likes this.

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                  • #10
                    I grew up in the UP of Michigan and currently live in Maine, so I have experienced blizzards and very heavy snowstorms.

                    Despite the constant barrage of storm warnings, and all of the technology involved in weather forecasts and computer models, sometimes I think that people were better prepared for such things forty years ago than they are today.

                    Rather depending on a radio or television station to tell them what was coming, people paid more attention to the weather and, overall, perhaps people were more capable then.

                    It seems to me that the forecasters are constantly warning us about one thing or another today, and that most of it is so badly exaggerated that no one believes any of it anymore. Throughout this past winter, every single storm that we had (and we didnít have any blizzards) was exaggerated by about ten times. The last time we were warned to expect as much as three feet of snow, we got a few inches.

                    Perhaps it is something as simple as the need to attract viewers by keeping them tuned into their television set, but the warnings are always over the top of the reality.

                    As for the article, people who live in areas that might be expected to experience a blizzard should have these things on hand at all times, with supplies stored in the house, as well as the emergency items kept in the car.

                    I wonder though, about the recommendation for ďall weather tires,Ē since I decided a few years back that I would never go another winter without studded tires. Yes, I know that it does say that studded tires or snow chains are a necessity in icy conditions, but you can pretty much anticipate icy conditions with the coming of winter, and studded tires arenít something that you can pull over along the road to put on.

                    I delay switching over to my studded tires until after what I judge to be a long-term snow, being one thatís not likely to melt the following day, since itís not good to drive studded tires around on dry pavement.

                    True enough, there are parts of the country where studded tires are not a necessity but these are not the parts of the country where blizzards are common.
                    fcphdJim likes this.

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                    • #11
                      I always keep emergency supplies in my underground garage. Most of the garage is sunken into the ground, so the foundations are on top of it. It seems very unlikely that my house would fall apart, but my garage has emergency heating and supplies. I could probably survive for a week there if I had to.

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                      • #12
                        I'm from Florida, so we don't have too many winter storms. It's kind of like preparing for a Hurricane as you already have a plan before the storms hit. Food, water, batteries, and flash lights are a must in all weather related issues.

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                        • #13
                          I have never had to experience a blizzard thankfully, but it sounds like a very scary kind of winter storm. I wish more people would take it seriously if they live in areas that are at risk of such storms. With all the crazy insane winter weather on the East Coast the last couple of years, maybe people will finally get serious about preparing ahead of time for these things so they won't get caught in the rush and scramble right before a serious storm hits.

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                          • #14
                            Being from Indiana, we do not have too many major winter storms, but here lately we seem to really be in the line of fire. Stocking up on bottled water, non perishable foods and batteries is how we get ready. I live in the country on an 10 acre farm, and its not uncommon to not see a snow plow for a week after the snow. So getting out to restock for food may not happen for awhile here. We also have two kerosene heaters we keep for backup in case the electric goes out.

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                            • #15
                              I don't live in a country where winter storms happen. My husband lived in Boston for a while and he was quite surprised by the winter there. He said it was depressing and sad to experience winter, more so because he was away from us, his family. I also remember him having wounds on his eyes because of the cold. I told him to wear gloves to protect his hands and put some lotion on it but he didn't listen. It was also quite interesting that for him that winter was unbearable but he said that some of the people he saw walking in the street don't even wear jackets or heavy clothing. I guess he really just wasn't built and prepared for winter.

                              This article is quite helpful especially for people like my husband. They would need this information to prepare themselves in case a winter storm happens. I'd say buy more canned goods and pouched foods, those don't require heating at all. Stock up on mineral or purified water as well. It is important that you have the necessities if ever a winter storm happens.

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