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Decision Making in Emergency Response

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  • Decision Making in Emergency Response

    Emergency response problem solving, FEMA decision making models, examples of how those models have been utilized in real life incidents, and analysis.

    Emergency Response could be stated quite simply as problem solving.* Emergencies are typically complex problems with dire consequences that must...

    Click here to view the article.
    Live your dream, don't dream your life.
    Chris L-S, CEO/Owner/Administrator, Disaster.Com

  • #2
    Excellent article. When I was taking CPR and Emergency First Aid, we were taught this same method. We were also taught the three C's (Calm, Cool, Collected). I'm a little surprised it was not mentioned in the article because it is an important part of Emergency response and allows you to assess the situation in a more focused manner. Regardless, this is a good article and has a lot of great information.
    mairj23 likes this.

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    • #3
      Thanks for the article!

      Yeah, keeping a calm and critical mind during emergency situations is as important as taking proper care to aiding a victim in need of help. I have personally seen a lot of people go into mental shock, disbelief, or emotional distress in a emergency situation, and it does prove to easily distract and deter a human from doing what he or she needs to take care of their self and others who have been harmed. Being resilient in proper medical demeanor and minimizing emotional feelings, go far in allowing one's mind to be clear and focused on analyzing what needs to be done and what needn't be pursued.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by kevinkimers View Post
        Excellent article. When I was taking CPR and Emergency First Aid, we were taught this same method. We were also taught the three C's (Calm, Cool, Collected). I'm a little surprised it was not mentioned in the article because it is an important part of Emergency response and allows you to assess the situation in a more focused manner. Regardless, this is a good article and has a lot of great information.
        The three C's sound simple enough, but are definitely easier said than done. It takes a good deal of effort in a lot of situations, especially those that arise with little or no warning. Even those that are warned of in advance can be devastating and put people into a tailspin.

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        • #5
          Thanks for the article! I am really glad when people share valuable information like this. Information like this is really helpful in times when you need to take action. Once again thanks!

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          • #6
            They taught one basic thing that i still follow and it is "Help if u can lest refrain".Well there are many others but some are essential to process in the next course of action.Good article and thanks to you chris.

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            • #7
              The article's really helpful. For the inexperienced ones, however, it's a tall order to stay calm and avoid panicking during disasters. People tend to lose their wits and end up losing their ability to think straight. Perhaps if they take up disaster response and management courses, they'd be able to overcome their nerves whenever disaster strikes.

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              • #8
                This is a process that our brains go through to solve any problem we face. But like the operating system on our computers, we are generally not even aware of it. In a disaster situation, it is helpful to remember the simple process of problem solving. It may sound obvious, but when you are stressed and panicked, it helps give a clear track for your thoughts.

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                • #9
                  The Emergency First Response company has 3 things that are similar to the 3 c's mentioned. With Emergency First Response they say to Stop, Think, Act. This principle means that you should stop and take a look around before you decided to care for someone to make sure there is nothing around that is going to cause harm. Then you are supposed to think about what you are going to do, and then act. I teach FA/CPR classes and it seems like a simple concept for people to grasp.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by kevinkimers View Post
                    Excellent article. When I was taking CPR and Emergency First Aid, we were taught this same method. We were also taught the three C's (Calm, Cool, Collected). I'm a little surprised it was not mentioned in the article because it is an important part of Emergency response and allows you to assess the situation in a more focused manner. Regardless, this is a good article and has a lot of great information.

                    That's what I learned at CPR class too -the three Cs. You are right, it really is essential to stay calm, it's the only way you are going to be able to think clearly and make the right decisions. It is possible to make a bad situation much worse by losing your cool and I think it would be useful to promote this idea.

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                    • #11
                      I think it's all very fine in theory to stay calm and centered during emergency situations, the only thing is that not all of us are trained to deal with sudden disasters or emergencies. Many people will panic and possibly do more harm than good. I would say that in some instances it is preferred that people do as little as possible until trained emergency staff is available. Naturally, that can take ages, so the best way to help is to focus on nothing else but the immediate situation at hand.

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                      • #12
                        Great article for handling stressful and dangerous emergency situations. I will remember the principles and apply them when necessary. Great afbvice.

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                        • #13
                          The first problem in emergencies is the confusion that results into panic. Our orientation here is to use the term RELAX or KEEP CALM and never mention the word Panic. Those fully trained in rescue operations and emergencies have the presence of mind which is very important particularly when TRIAGE is needed. Triage means the evaluation of the survivors and identifying those that should be saved first.

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                          • #14
                            That's a good article, thanks. I've actually used the FEMA model with an Education company I was consulting with. They have school across Asia with a number of them located in areas where earthquakes, typhoons, or floods are a real concern. We extended our thinking to other potential disasters such as fires, violent intruders, and social unrest.

                            Thankfully we haven't had put to our planning to the test yet, but having an structured way to approach preparation was very helpful.

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                            • #15
                              Thank you for this article. I have always made it a priority to be prepared for any kind of disaster. I run regular drills with my family members (I am a college student living with my parents and my siblings) but sometimes they get lazy or they don't get the point. They call me paranoid but I know that when a disaster DOES strike, it really is better to be safe than sorry. Thanks again for the useful information. Cheers.
                              fcphdJim likes this.

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