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TIP: What to do if you're helping someone who needs medical attention

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  • TIP: What to do if you're helping someone who needs medical attention

    I've seen this one somewhere on Reddit, so all the credit (lol, rhyme!) goes there.

    If there's been a shooting, car crash or some other situation where someone is injured, and you are the one to help them, here's what to do:

    - Help them the best you can. If you are a driver or you've had any education related to the situation, you should know at least what to do.

    - Ambulance is most likely needed, so you need someone to call it while you're helping the wounded. Now, a common mistake is simply shouting "Someone call the ambulance!". No!
    People around are in shock and everyone is in the ''bystander effect'', which means everyone is expecting someone else to do it. So point in someone and tel him "You, in the green jacket, call 911!"

    It's a tip that could be the difference between life and death, and it's good to know.
    Lexi likes this.

  • #2
    I would follow the quote,"If you can't help at least don't hurt".I have been trained by Red cross on how to respond to situations like these and i would like to add some brief notes of what i do in these situations.
    Keep Calm
    Never try anything out of the box
    If the person has been badly injured in the leg,then provide support to the leg to maintain proper blood flow,you can even use his hand if its not injured.
    Make sure he gets to drink enough water.
    If the person has some sort of brain disorder and has epilepsy,catch hold of his shoulder and close his ears,that is the perfect trick
    If the area is remote and if the patient is oozing blood,never tie the wound,it will only lessen the pressure.Instead you can flex those parts and if the bleeding still doesnt stop,invert it at an angle where the blood flow will be in opposite direction
    Thats some i could think of,i will add more if i remember.
    dillinger10 likes this.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by bala View Post
      I would follow the quote,"If you can't help at least don't hurt".I have been trained by Red cross on how to respond to situations like these and i would like to add some brief notes of what i do in these situations.
      Keep Calm
      Never try anything out of the box
      If the person has been badly injured in the leg,then provide support to the leg to maintain proper blood flow,you can even use his hand if its not injured.
      Make sure he gets to drink enough water.
      If the person has some sort of brain disorder and has epilepsy,catch hold of his shoulder and close his ears,that is the perfect trick
      If the area is remote and if the patient is oozing blood,never tie the wound,it will only lessen the pressure.Instead you can flex those parts and if the bleeding still doesnt stop,invert it at an angle where the blood flow will be in opposite direction
      Thats some i could think of,i will add more if i remember.
      Thanks for sharing your own experiences and training with us, bala. This information is really helpful. It is very important to remain calm as often times the first instinct is to panic or go into shock. Perhaps you could include this information in an article and Chris can post this in the articles section of the site as this would be very beneficial for those without your training.

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by dillinger10 View Post

        Thanks for sharing your own experiences and training with us, bala. This information is really helpful. It is very important to remain calm as often times the first instinct is to panic or go into shock. Perhaps you could include this information in an article and Chris can post this in the articles section of the site as this would be very beneficial for those without your training.
        Do you really think this is worth mentioning in an article.i really thought it as all common.Anyways if this is really worth a share,i will write a few pages on my real life experiences and what St John's and Red cross teach us all.
        Thanks for your confidence in me(writing an article..:P).
        Would demonstration videos help..??

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by Trickster View Post
          I've seen this one somewhere on Reddit, so all the credit (lol, rhyme!) goes there.

          If there's been a shooting, car crash or some other situation where someone is injured, and you are the one to help them, here's what to do:

          - Help them the best you can. If you are a driver or you've had any education related to the situation, you should know at least what to do.

          - Ambulance is most likely needed, so you need someone to call it while you're helping the wounded. Now, a common mistake is simply shouting "Someone call the ambulance!". No!
          People around are in shock and everyone is in the ''bystander effect'', which means everyone is expecting someone else to do it. So point in someone and tel him "You, in the green jacket, call 911!"

          It's a tip that could be the difference between life and death, and it's good to know.
          The tip about singling out someone specific is a good one because sometimes in a crisis situation everyone waits for someone else to take action.
          Thanks for sharing it. I'll remember it if I'm in a situation like that.

          Comment


          • #6
            You should make sure that you phone an ambulance, because if you have done it personally, then you know it has been done. I also think that people should remember NOT to move the person who has been injured unless their life is in danger by leaving them where they are. If you move them, you run the risk of causing further injury if they have damaged their spine, neck or head. Keep them as warm as possible and if they are drifting in and out of consciousness, try to keep them awake by holding their attention with conversation.

            Comment


            • #7
              Gemma, if you can do it personally that's great, but what if the person needs your full attention? That's why I brought up the topic in the first place. Good advice by the way!

              ASCAPA, I'm glad this thread helped at least one person! Who knows when you might put this info to use. Or any of us, for that matter.

              Great advice, bala!

              Comment


              • #8
                Thanks for the tips! I can relate with the second one greatly. Just a few weeks ago, the metro train here in the Philippines overshoot the tracks at the last station. A lot of people were injured because of the impact. Based on the reports, some people just stood by, while some of them just took out their phones to take videos. Medical attention wasn't given to the victims promptly. Fortunately, no one was killed. Still, if only people would just cease to be bystanders first, many lives would be saved.

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                • #9
                  Thanks for the tips everyone! This is much needed information for me & I'm sure it will benefit others in the event of being in this situation. However, I feel if I were faced with this situation, my gut instincts would probably kick in. I know a little about administering CPR & I can perform an abdominal thrust. If someone were shot or cut very bad, I would give the shirt off my back to help stop the bleeding and call 911 immediately. That's common basic sense. Again, thanks for all of the information.

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                  • #10
                    My mom witnessed a terrible accident on the freeway during a busy time of day and immediately pulled out her phone to call 911, as did like, 20 others, they actually jammed the lines and her call didn't go through because so many dialed at once.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by bala View Post
                      Do you really think this is worth mentioning in an article.i really thought it as all common.Anyways if this is really worth a share,i will write a few pages on my real life experiences and what St John's and Red cross teach us all.
                      Thanks for your confidence in me(writing an article..:P).
                      Would demonstration videos help..??
                      Hmm... I think it was intended as a sarcasm.. Hehe.. Anyway when you are in the vicinity of an accident ex. (road/car accicent) Be sure to record the time it happened and call 911 and report it immediately. Check for survivors. Also If you're a novice into this don't be a hero and just randomly pull the victim out of his/her car. He may have a serious bone fracture/injury and you may have just worsen it. Let the professionals do their work. You did your part by reporting it to the concern government agency.

                      This is so you avoid getting filed a lawsuit against for worsening or improper handling of victims.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        In the first place you should call an ambulance. You should sit with the person you're helping at least until they arrive. Try talking to them if they can talk, and let them know an ambulance is coming and that they're going to be OK.

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                        • #13
                          Well I agree, staying calm is the first step. In most situations, first contact to the injured is a bystander. If not trained, then its best just to call for help and mark perimeter around the person so no further damage is done. I used to work in a hospital, in quite a few situations, the ambulance did not arrive fast enough and the person expired on scene. Many incidents could have been avoided if person responded quickly enough to stop blood loss. This does not apply everywhere, I'm just speaking from personal experience about the hospital I worked at. For some reason, I'm not sure if its because of high crime rate or lack of professionalism by EMTs that worked there, they always responded fairly late. Respond time varies between 5-15 minutes on usual, but there were times that they failed altogether to respond or responded 30-45 mins after dispatch. The hospital was is Bronx, NY. I worked nights and there were countless stab and gun shot wound victims coming in.

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                          • #14
                            I surely would not know what to do. Anyway, I always save emergency numbers on my phone. So the first thing I would do would be to call an ambulance. Then, if there are people with big cuts, I would tie their wounds with clothing to avoid excessive bleeding before medics arrive. That is all I know. Anyway, I think it could be of great help.

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                            • #15
                              Good tip. People panic in situations like these and don't know what to do. It's great to read suggestions like these to be prepared in the case of an emergency. I haven't been in a similar situation but I'll know what to do if it happens!

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