Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Stranded at Sea

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Stranded at Sea

    I have heard of fishermen being lost at sea quite a few times. Fortunately, some of them have found their way to safety or have been rescued. It is always a joyful occasion when they return to their anxious family and friends but the stories they share of how they survived are most amazing. I have heard of situations where all the men had to eat were the fish they had caught. Sometimes they had to eat them raw or those a bit more fortunate were able to roast them using resources available to catch a fire. Others who were more unfortunate, or who were stranded for an extended time, reported that they had to resort to eating parts of their own body, the sole of their feet to be exact, in order to survive. Sea water was the only water available after supplies ran out so often they are severely dehydrated when rescued. These are just some of the bizarre stories shared yet the fact that they survived give their stories a positive turn. Do you know of similar situations and how have individuals survived?

  • #2
    I don't know any specific stories myself, but I have read about sailors in the old days facing this king of thing if they were becalmed for a long time. One thing I remember was that they chewed leather when all the food ran out. Not every part of he ocean is easy to catch fish in, especially if you are not a fishing vessel.

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by DancingLady View Post
      I don't know any specific stories myself, but I have read about sailors in the old days facing this king of thing if they were becalmed for a long time. One thing I remember was that they chewed leather when all the food ran out. Not every part of he ocean is easy to catch fish in, especially if you are not a fishing vessel.
      Chewing leather ??
      Sailors of the old used to flint up stones and roast fish and heat up water as well.They fought duels and killed each other for food.Leather is made out the tanneries,it can be fatal if you eat it.

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by bala View Post
        Chewing leather ??
        Sailors of the old used to flint up stones and roast fish and heat up water as well.They fought duels and killed each other for food.Leather is made out the tanneries,it can be fatal if you eat it.
        I have read stories of Sir Henry Morgan's crew eating their leather satchels in 1670 to stave off the pangs of hunger. I believe that the old way to make leather was generally to use tannic acid, which although very bitter, was generally harmless. Due to modern manufacturing, I wouldn't really want to eat today's leather goods.

        Comment


        • #5
          I can't imagine how that would be if I found myself in a situation where I was forced to eat parts of my own body in order to survive. In all honesty, I can't fully comprehend how eating the soles of your feet would give you enough nourishment to survive. Also, the first thing that comes to my mind is that you could easily die from an infection of your exposed flesh as your immune system is already running on its last batteries. At the same time, what if nobody comes to rescue you, and you happen to get close to some land... you wouldn't be able to walk.

          Comment


          • #6
            I remember the story of a fisherman who got stranded in the ocean for 2 weeks, he is able to survive from catching fish. There is also the incident of a man who claimed genus rescued by Dolphins. This is an old news article about the man who claimed he was rescued by Dolphins:

            http://globalvoicesonline.org/2008/1...ns-and-whales/

            I believe there had been multiple claims of stranded people saying they were saved by dolphins.

            I also remember the incident of a man who got stranded in the ocean for weeks and he survived by riding a floating drift wood and he got rescued by Japanese fishermen. He didn't know he already reached the Japanese waters and he had survived with no food or water.

            Comment


            • #7
              I knew personally two men who were lost and sea but sadly they were unable to survive. We all had hope that they were out there somewhere but months later their bodies washed up on shore. The first guy was within a month but the second guys body wasn't found until months later. As long as they didn't find the bodies there was always hope. Both of these men had young families at home. It was very sad and tragic.

              Comment


              • #8
                I don't recall any specific situation but I must say I admire people that have been successful in surviving those tough situations! I can't even imagine how hard it is to only have fish and sea water at your disposal. i hope they got the therapy they deserved!

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by dillinger10 View Post

                  I have read stories of Sir Henry Morgan's crew eating their leather satchels in 1670 to stave off the pangs of hunger. I believe that the old way to make leather was generally to use tannic acid, which although very bitter, was generally harmless. Due to modern manufacturing, I wouldn't really want to eat today's leather goods.
                  Earlier the leather treatment included processes like bating where proteolytic proteins were introduced to the skin and depickling to raise the pH out of the acidic region.
                  Today's leather is all treated out of Chromium salts & formaldehyde solutions,making it dangerous to eat.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Eating the soles of their foot? Eek! Such a terrible way to survive but in this situation, they really have no choice. I know of this one story where the fisherman survived by eating fish & birds and drinking turtle blood & rainwater. Though there have been doubts on whether his story is true.
                    Josť Salvador Alvarenga's boat was reported missing from Mexican port in late 2012, supporting claim of 13-month sea ordeal
                    dillinger10 likes this.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      In Hawaii sometimes the fog would roll out and fishing boats would actually have to stop and check their GPS devices or compasses to find land again. I've had friends that actually had their main motors stop working and they had to use their small back up motors to get to shore. For the most part their are currents in the Hawaiian Islands and most of the fishermen that I know know where you will end up if your boat floats on its own fora couple of hours.

                      Comment

                      Working...
                      X