Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Cameras and Disaster

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #16
    Originally posted by xTinx View Post
    If you're the first one to arrive on the scene, it would be more ethical to aid the victims and ask immediate help rather than film their suffering. What if no one else is there besides yourself? You can't keep on thinking that somebody will come just so you can continue filming.
    Second that.Quite my perception on this too.it ain't ethical and it arises a sense of guilt when we film it when they are suffering.
    have you ever had an instane that you can recollect on or may be cite an instance you know.We could discuss further and arrive at a resolution.

    Comment


    • #17
      I covered a nearby tornado once for a citizen journalist site I used to work for. I was there taking photos and doing interviews after the fact though. Even so, people are shocked and upset. It's important to have empathy and to not be intrusive. I always asked if I could talk to them or take pictures first, before just jumping in. It's devastating to experience such a disaster, so care should be taken when dealing with the survivors. Some were willing to tell their stories, but others just wanted to be left alone. I can respect that, and I think others should as well.
      bala and fcphdJim like this.

      Comment


      • #18
        Originally posted by Zyni View Post
        I covered a nearby tornado once for a citizen journalist site I used to work for. I was there taking photos and doing interviews after the fact though. Even so, people are shocked and upset. It's important to have empathy and to not be intrusive. I always asked if I could talk to them or take pictures first, before just jumping in. It's devastating to experience such a disaster, so care should be taken when dealing with the survivors. Some were willing to tell their stories, but others just wanted to be left alone. I can respect that, and I think others should as well.
        Exactly and it might just as well hurt emotions when we photograph them.Sometimes it does,and it doesn't sometime.
        its good to ask them beforehand,but covering it in a disaster becomes inevitable,because we need a proof for that.Good job by you though.

        Comment


        • #19
          I have always found this very disrespectful and heartless. I would think the best solution would be for these cameramen to actually help the victims first and then take a photograph. It is very rude to actually take a photo of people in their worst moment trying to actually make sense of everything.
          It's almost crossing the line into someones personal space and sadness when the cameramen try to document someone else's life through pictures.

          Comment


          • #20
            I agree with you, there are a lot of impertinent people out there, if you are going to record/take pictures about the situation and you know that this isn't making anyone uncomfortable or affecting somebody's intimacy then it's fine, it's a great way of showing how the things actually happened, because the media isn't always a reliable source of information.

            Comment


            • #21
              If you have to choose between saving a person's life and filming the event and you choose to tape it then I can only feel sorry for you. It's always important to film disasters happening around the world, especially if you need it as evidence for the police but you should always help someone in need if you're in a position to do so.

              Comment


              • #22
                I also believe that helping others in distress should be your first concern when caught in a challenging situation. Standing around with a camera and trying to capture what is going on, while others around you might be drowning or suffering in some other way, is definitely a low act in my personal opinion. An article I read a while ago comes to mind, where a girl took a selfie while a man was hanging from a bridge behind her, about to commit suicide.

                Comment


                • #23
                  Originally posted by vinceasneed View Post
                  Many people are criticized for using cameras during disasters. Some people feel that those people should be helping instead of recording what is going on. I think it will depends on the situation. Sometimes there is help already there. And also it sometimes can be a good thing for people to see what is going on in particular location so they can help. I do feel that if a person sees people in distress, that they should respond by helping first and foremost and only record it if they intend to use it for good.
                  It depends on how cameras are used.

                  I have previous experience in storm chasing whereas I purposely chased tornadoes to give video and experience the thrill of being close to nature's mysterious vortexes. As I got older, I shifted more towards storm spotting due to it being more geared at helping the community but anyways, storm chasers often chase to earn money and they don't think when they are taking photos and videos of victims in many cases. That sort of activity can be seen as wrong even if it was not meant to be wrong. Common sense is an important tool to discover and use when you sport a camera of any kind during a crisis situation.

                  However, photography and video in a disaster area should not be discouraged. The images and footage can be a quite useful component for evidence, science and training in regards to that particular disaster. It could even solve a reason for why the disaster occurred.

                  Comment


                  • #24
                    Originally posted by bala View Post
                    Second that.Quite my perception on this too.it ain't ethical and it arises a sense of guilt when we film it when they are suffering.
                    have you ever had an instane that you can recollect on or may be cite an instance you know.We could discuss further and arrive at a resolution.
                    It's because of social media, which has fostered the culture of oversharing, that people are slowly losing their sense of decency and empathy. Help should come first and picture-sharing later.

                    Comment


                    • #25
                      I think it depends. Sometimes, when there's an accident and there are casualties, I see people getting their phones and snapping pictures of the dead. For me, for what purpose? I mean, I doubt that these people would even use such pictures for the investigation, it's all for personal use. Plus, they don't have the permission of the family to snap those photos.

                      If you do work for media, then it is your job to snap those photos. But I don't like it when they hype up the scenario or add up some things about the story. Take the pictures and know the real story, this way you're doing the casualties a favour of relaying their story.

                      Comment


                      • #26
                        I agree, it totally depends on the situation. When you are not in a position to assist it could be a good idea to get some film or pictures to send to any emergency preparedness groups. It is also harder to assess the situation when you are using a camera, but to have film of the situation could prevent other complications from experience. Also would be a good promotion tool.

                        Comment


                        • #27
                          I guess it depends on the situation, but helping people should probably be your top priority. But you can flip that around and say that if you weren't there, they wouldn't be helped by you. I don't think it's that difficult to hold a camera, what will most likely be a small smartphone today, and help someone with your other hand. Strap it to your belt or put it in your shirt pocket to film so that you have evidence of what happened and help someone along the way. If you work for the media, then it's your job to take photos instead of helping because it's what you are supposed to do. Nobody should feel obliged to help if it's not their job to, it may sound harsh, but it's survival of the fittest as far as I see it.

                          On the flip side, I recently read in the news that a beached baby dolphin died ashore because everyone wanted to take selfies with it. So instead of rescuing it and taking it back into the ocean, everyone took out their phones and started taking pictures with it. Afterwards it was left on the beach to die. That's really pathetic and shows that there is no hope for the majority of people out there these days.

                          Comment

                          Working...
                          X