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Volunteers Undergo Training For Animals Affected By Natural Disasters

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  • Volunteers Undergo Training For Animals Affected By Natural Disasters

    VILONIA, AR- A group of people in Central Arkansas are prepared to undergo training when it comes to emergency animal rescue. After the April 27th tornado, Faulkner County leaders say it became apparent there was no clear plan to help injured livestock or other large animals.

    This weekend in Mississippi, specialized veterinarians will teach Arkansas volunteers how to care for large animals in a natural disaster. Community members say it's important to get more people trained so they know what to do and how to help, if faced with a similar situation again.
    http://www.arkansasmatters.com/story...TkeyMsNnxnsCow

    I think this is a great initiative. I think all states should be required by law to implement these types of training sessions. According to the story, 121 animals were killed during the tornado and a further 70 were injured. Most states are unprepared for caring for livestock during natural disasters.

    Would you volunteer for this kind of training?
    devichan likes this.

  • #2
    If i lived in an area that raised cows i would. Sounds like a great plan. Good to know someone is looking out for our furry friends.

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    • #3
      Here in Florida we now have designated pet friendly emergency shelters, and I think there are some drop-of shelters.

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      • #4
        I know in the past worry about pets and livestock kept a lot of people from taking appropriate steps to secure their own safety. Shelters for pets help for that, but larger animals need help too. (Does anyone remember the scene in Twister with the horses running? I always felt so awful for them!) It's good to see this kind of initiative. Is this a pilot program, or are you aware of programs like it in other areas?

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        • #5
          I do think this is a good idea, because I don't want to see any animals suffer either. Still, I'm always more concerned for people. As long as we still have people dying during disasters, I think finding better ways to help human beings should be the priority.

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          • #6
            I am so glad to hear that. In Australia we have volunteers who help to nurture injured wildlife back to health. But as far as it goes for rescuing animals, it's mostly the firemen and women who evacuate trapped, injured or confused animals.
            I have predominantly lived in remote country regions of Australia, where people have the common sense to rescue any kind of animal that gets into trouble during a storm, fire or flood.

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            • #7
              Fantastic idea! If disaster strikes and you loose your house it's even worse to loose your money making sources, this if you're a farmer. Not to mention that livestock can provide much needed food when access routes/stores are closed. Plus, horses/cows you can use as transportation, help with cleaning the land.

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              • #8
                http://www.washingtonsart.org/intro
                We have one or two volunteers on our CERT/SAR team who plan to join and go through the training. During this summer's catastrophic Carlton Complex fire hundreds of cattle and other livestock were overrun by the flames before the ranchers could rescue them. Many of those that were rescued and relocated required temporary housing and care. It was a huge undertaking. Several ranches and farms in my county provided assistance, as did the fairgrounds. We saw firsthand the need for trained volunteers to lead the effort in saving animals. Hopefully we will never need an animal rescue on that scale in our county, but the more prepared we are for the possibility, the better off we will be if anything similar does happen.

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                • #9
                  I'm impressed and it's great that someone thought of this. Livestock is an important source of income for many individuals in the rural areas. In fact, when Haiyan wrecked the Visayas, animals especially chickens were compeletely wiped out. Bantayan's economy plummeted. Many people were left jobless. It was difficult to bounce bank when their properties as well as their main source of income were all destroyed. They didn't have enough capital to pick up where the typhoon left off. I hope the local governments of disaster-stricken areas will take the initiative to conduct trainings of this nature to prepare their citizens for future disasters.

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                  • #10
                    I won’t as I am living in a city where there is no livestock. There are pets like cats and dogs. I think their owners are capable of caring them.

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