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What are the Basic Rights and Privileges of those hit by Disasters?

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  • What are the Basic Rights and Privileges of those hit by Disasters?

    There seems to be no clear cut policy as to how much help you can get from the local government during times of post-disaster. If you lost your entire house, say due to a strong tsunami, and the terrain no longer looks familiar, from where do you start? There will be government assistance for sure like evacuation centers and food supplies handed out. Up to what extent? Maybe there should be something like a universal policy(if there is none yet) for the victims since I think these disasters are here to happen over and over and will just get worse as predicted by experts.

  • #2
    I would say it should be up to those that still have something left to give after a disaster hits. It's kind of not fair, though, if people that survive can't afford to donate but are then forced to. I'm just saying that the rich of the world should be out there giving to people that need it, but those that do need it should just get what they need to get back on their feet and nothing more.

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    • #3
      I think that every people has the right to it's dignity, food, clothes, water and a place to sleep. these are the basic needs, if the circumstances of the disaster allow for more, better for everyone, but if not I think that is a good start.

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      • #4
        I think that people have the right to have the basic needs of life, such as food, clothes, water, shelter. If people choose to donate then these rights would have improved and be more better in quality, but the basics of things like these are a right.

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        • #5
          One of the most important requirements is medical aid for the seriously injured. Without immediate medical attention there will be more deaths amongst those who have survived.

          Equally important is fresh drinking water. Humans can survive for weeks without food but will be dead within days when there is nothing to drink. In many disasters the existing water supply becomes contaminated and anyone drinking it will be in danger of serious illness or death.

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          • #6
            FEMA has a whole webpage of their policies for national disaster practices, including documents on issues such as response, recovery and housing. These policies are federally mandated and available for the general public to download as PDF files. My local state, Michigan, has a smaller group of policies in place which are more like referrals to Red Cross, State Police and resources for Small Business Administration that can be found under their US Department of Housing and Urban Development pages online. I think you will find that there are formal policies which outline each states plan of attack, so to speak, in case of disaster, as well as Federal involvement. However, I think that the rights are closely tied with the resource availability and where it may fall apart is getting those resources to the needy in the actual crisis. It doesnít matter what rights or policies are outlined on paper if the implementation of them is flawed. Thatís why I think that mock disaster scenarios are really important to volunteer in. That way, the policies can be enacted in a mock situation and see just what sort of rights get trampled on when people are in the throes of disaster, and the kinds of relief that actual are readily available to be enacted.

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            • #7
              Often the human rights violations are not intended or planned. Sometimes they result from insufficient resources and capacities to prepare and respond to the consequences of the disasters. More often, they are the result of inappropriate policies, neglect or oversight. These violations could be avoided if both national and international actors took the relevant human rights guarantees into account from the beginning. Missions and evaluations by the Representative of the UN Secretary-General on the human rights of internally displaced persons show that not only national authorities are often unaware of the relevance of human rights norms in the context of natural disasters. International agencies and non-governmental organizations are also at a loss as to how to incorporate a human rights-based approach into emergency relief and response, even though many of the laws and codes of conduct applicable in situations of natural disaster include such guarantees.

              Human rights have to be the legal underpinning of all humanitarian work pertaining to natural disasters. There is no other legal framework to guide such activities, especially in areas where there is no armed conflict. If humanitarian assistance is not based on a human rights framework, there is a risk that the focus will be too narrow and the basic needs of the victims will not be integrated into a holistic planning process. There is also the risk that factors important for recovery and reconstruction will be overlooked. Furthermore, neglecting the human rights of those affected by natural disasters means overlooking the fact that such people do not live in a legal vacuum, but in countries with laws, rules and institutions that should protect their rights. International human rights principles should guide disaster risk management, including pre-disaster mitigation and preparedness measures, emergency relief and rehabilitation, and reconstruction efforts. Those at risk need to be protected against violence and abuse. Those displaced need to be provided with protection and assistance and need to be able either to return in safety and in dignity to their original lands and property, or to be assisted to integrate locally int he area to which they have fled or to settle elsewhere in the country. Adherence to international human rights standards will help to ensure that the basic needs of victims or beneficiaries are met. The challenge often is how to apply these rules in an operational context.

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              • #8
                The legislation regarding mass disasters is not really well established or defined in certain places around the world, especially because they haven't had to deal with those particular disaster issues unlike other more prone to calamity zones. I definitely agree that we should have a universal type of assurance in case of mass disasters like fires, tornados, landslides, floods etc. but that doesn't really happen outside of US, especialy in third world countries, they will more often than not need governmental aid from governments of other countries since not even their government covers the expenses or sometimes even the procedures to set in motion during such events.

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                • #9
                  Last year, around November, there was a category 5 typhoon that hit the Philippines. Several areas were it, but Tacloban was given so much attention that other place were ignored. Since one place have so much attention, the aid poured only on one place and the other areas have no access to clean water, food, and other necessities. Media itself will help speed up the aid to affected areas and bring things people will need. These needs and rights include the right for proper housing, access to food and water, the right to help locate missing relatives, the right to inform unaffected relatives that they are still alive, and the right of privacy in their dark times.

                  There are still a lot of things we need to do in order to be ready to respond to disasters. However, the basic right of people should be the fact that they were warned earlier about it.

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                  • #10
                    Your problem OP, is that you do not understand the difference between the words rights and privileges, they're exact opposites. Rights are a subset of property, which the latter express "that which is proper and exclusive for one's private use only e.g. your head, arms, legs, etc." Privileges are like licenses, it is given from a ruling entity to a begging [petition] or enslaved human. Do your own further and in-depth research about these two words, it will help clarify a lot of misinformation and false assumptions.

                    My answer to you question: the people aka Public, always have the right to be aided by their ascribed and believed Government entity [all Agents and Agencies], especially during natural disasters - rights are inalienable and inherent, and can only be given away; privileges can be given and taken away at any moment the granter wishes to do so, which U.S. Citizens have priveleges.
                    fcphdJim likes this.

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                    • #11
                      I believe every person should have the basic right to food, dry clothes, drinkable clean water, and shelter. It may not be difficult to achieve because of the lack or resources but we should make our effort.

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                      • #12
                        Around here, the help one receives from the government in case of disaster depends on the budget. There were years when after a flood that wiped an entire villages the government quickly built some small basic housing for the people to start anew. And there are other years when people receive no help and must start anew on their own.

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                        • #13
                          One of the courses that touches upon this is IS-21.14: Civil Rights and FEMA Disaster Assistance. It outlines the basic rights that all citizens seeking disaster assistance should expect and should be provided by FEMA representatives. If one is working their way through the IS courses, its a short, but informative, one to complete.
                          fcphdJim likes this.
                          "Success is survival." ~ Leonard Cohen

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                          • #14
                            I think you are lucky if you live in a country where the government offers disaster relief funds. I have traveled in many third world countries and heard plenty of harrowing stories about people surviving earthquakes and floods, losing everything. Thankfully, family bonds are strong and relatives will help out in most cases. But there are also situations where the families are so poor that they can't offer any real help. So, I think if I got caught up in a serious disaster and lost all my belongings, I would be just glad to receive whatever I can get.

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                            • #15
                              Oh, how I'm glad I found this thread. The thing is, although I'm aware of several of such rights, I'm not really sure about the scope and limitations of "looting," a subject covered in specific provisions. An article did claim that
                              There is no other legal framework to guide such activities, especially in areas where there is no armed conflict.
                              . Anyway, you can read the full article here: http://www.brookings.edu/research/re...ural-disasters.

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