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Building with no fire exit

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  • #16
    Originally posted by Gelsemium View Post
    No way that recent buildings can be built with no fire exit, that's a demand from the law, if there is a control the building doesn't advance or needs to suffer changes. In the case of schools that is impossible, hundreds of people attend them and evacuation plans and fire exists have to exist.
    If it's in a third world, corruption laden country, then this is quite possible. Building inspectors are easily bribed and so are the fire inspectors.
    Last edited by BigBang; 08-12-2014, 10:43 PM.
    Zyni likes this.

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    • #17
      A fire exit is one of those things like a seat belt. Sometimes it is easy to overlook just how important one is until something terrible happens. You would think that there have been enough disasters in the news for people to realize that there is a reason not having one is illegal. I would definitely report this to the proper authorities. The life you save might just be yours.

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      • #18
        I cannot believe that building with no fire exit can still exist with the legislation today. There should be exits you did not know of. It reminds me of a fire accident about a decade ago that many lives were lost not because of the fire flames itself but the smoke. There were too many people inside the building but the exit was too small. The people were not able to get out of the building in time.

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        • #19
          Buildings without a fire exit should be modified in such a way as to add one. I know that fires can be overlooked since they're not that common in some places but what tragedy will happen when a fire does start? Anyway, in most countries there are plenty of laws (with very high fines) requiring a fire exit.

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          • #20
            Well, not that in my country we don't have fire exits, but also most of the buildings are being constructed bad when it comes about emergency escape. The door should open outside meanwhile most of them open inside, so when everyone is trying to get as soon as possible out of a place, they will be pushing, and since the door is opening inside, the people will be trapped like rats, I don't even want to think about that.

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            • #21
              Unfortunately, this is a common thing in Sarajevo. About half of the buildings, if not more, don't have fire exit. I wondered about it too, especially as my grandpa is an architect and he worked on several buildings and he said that the funding sometimes isn't approved and they take it down, which doesn't make sense. I mean, he's powerless, he must do as he's told, but what if something happened? A fire at, let's say 16th floor. How do the people get away? There must be a fire escape. I've not seen so many around here, unfortunately, which is more than worrying, especially when you consider the history of the city. There's actually a building which is called a ''Match'' and the reason for that is pretty obvious. One day, as the fire started, it simply lit up - the whole building almost at once. They realised the fire was spreading quickly because of the staircase, but only after it was over. The number of casualties... I can't believe this is happening still.

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              • #22
                I have seen a lot of apartments without fire exits. I think I can attest to that fact since my previous apartment has none. It was a death trap if a stray spark causes flames. The fact now is different. The apartment I am living in has fire exits, fire alarm, and a fire extinguisher nearby. I feel much safer now. There was a news report some time back that local authorities in the Philippines are enforcing the fire safety requirements. I have not heard any more since. The fact that there are still fire hazards everywhere shows that it is not entirely enforced.

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                • #23
                  Yea people only realize when a fire occurs at how important it is for a building or room to have a fire exit. I am sure many have died because of these building "mishaps". Whether it be overlooked because of a genuine construction error or to save money and line the pockets of some fat cat, it is unacceptable. I do not imagine I will be moving anytime soon but if I do, or someone I care about does, I will be more vigilant about this. I am on the third floor of my apartment building. Jumping is out of the question but there is an elevator and stairs. Also I am a pretty good climber so I can climb down one of the drain pipes if need be.

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                  • #24
                    What can I say? I have been to schools in Ecuador and Colombia where, in case of a fire, students would have to climb into nearby trees in order to escape a fire. There simply is no funding for any kind of emergency structure available. I think it's hard for people who have never visited the third world to understand what it is like if there simply are no resources available for even the most basic requirements, and that people have to be resourceful at all times, especially during times of disaster.

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                    • #25
                      That's definitely something you should be bringing up to the administrator. This is most certainly against the law, especially the fact that it's a university, and it houses the lives of many, many students. There's honestly nothing much only you yourself can do, but with enough attention, the higher-ups in your university should be pushed to get something done, especially if the authorities will be involved.

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                      • #26
                        Originally posted by Nate5 View Post
                        That's definitely something you should be bringing up to the administrator. This is most certainly against the law, especially the fact that it's a university, and it houses the lives of many, many students. There's honestly nothing much only you yourself can do, but with enough attention, the higher-ups in your university should be pushed to get something done, especially if the authorities will be involved.
                        In poorer countries it is generally tougher to get this kind of corrupt behavior removed and people punished accordingly. There is too much black money exchanged between these contractors and police officers. Nobody cares. It takes a strong honest politician (which is few and far these days) to really make changes.

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                        • #27
                          Originally posted by BigBang View Post
                          There was a fire disaster about a couple of decades back, at this famous club where young people gathered. And yes, it had no fire exit. Only the main door served as both entry and exit. The dual doors only swung inwards. When the fire broke out, most of the people inside died. Very few survived and those who did were badly scarred for life. After the incident, it was the only time the government made strict measures of inspecting establishments of proper fire exits.

                          I think I know this story. It's the Ozone disco tragedy in the Philippines, right? I have heard of this before. It's really disheartening. Because of the faulty design of the place, more than a hundred young people had to die and suffer. I don't even know if the culprits got punished for it. I hope they did.

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                          • #28
                            It depends on the country you are referring too. I know in the west there are safety codes to follow and such. Permits, licenses, and safety inspections are part of the normal business entities and building. Now in third world countries, that's not the case at all. In the Philippines for example. You can build anything you want without going through the proper channels because the system here is not up to par with the west. If a government official does say anything just slip him a few thousand pesos and he will go away or forge some kind of documentation for you. Here they call it "FIXING".

                            Materials here are substandard. Hollow blocks are brittle and smaller then normal western blocks. The sand they use for cement come straight from the ground so that means it has dirt in it making it brittle when it dries. This is the stuff they are making government buildings with mind you.

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                            • #29
                              As others have said this kind of stuff simply isn't existant in the west. In the UK where I live for example, every building that is considered to be occupied, whether temporarily or permanently (basically meaning anywhere a person could be at any time) is required to have a minimum of one exit at least (I think ten) ten metres away from the entrance to the building. Basic safety to ensure that if a fire breaks out near the entrance, there's a safe place to exit. Most windows are also "fire-safe" now, meaning they open widely outwards to enable somebody to climb out if it became a necessity in a dangerous situation.

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                              • #30
                                This is honestly something the school needs to work on if they give interests towards their students. It is very important to have fire exits at all times or else when a fire does occur people will not know what to do because they will become trapped and possibly die. We all know that would be a very tragic event, but if it was to happen that would more than likely be the outcome.
                                I hope that they resolve that problem and look for an alternative.

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