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Eastern US Blizzard

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  • Eastern US Blizzard

    18 deaths, 200,000 people without power, and up to 40 in. of snow for those affected by the blizzard hitting the Eastern US. 11 states declare a state of emergency and #snowmageddon2016 used to track this storm on social media. What resources are available to those in need and how do we better anticipate these types of storms?

    http://www.bbc.com/news/world-us-canada-35392008


  • #2
    There is indeed some wild weather going on back east. For whatever it is worth, Disaster.com has an article about really nasty winter weather: The Winter Storm: Preparing for and Surviving a Blizzard

    "Success is survival." ~ Leonard Cohen

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    • #3
      It's strange, really. I'm from New Hampshire, and from what I hear from friends and family, this is barely anything. I'm currently in Pittsburgh right now, and we barely got any accumulation at all. A disappointment, really. I was looking forward to tunneling through the streets!

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      • #4
        Apparently, some areas got a lot of snow, while other areas further north, which usually are harder hit by storms, either got less snow, or maybe none at all.
        A friend who lives in Maine said that they have not had any kind of snow from this storm.
        Also an issue , was the flooding along the jersey shoreline. This time, it was the southern Jersey shore that had the worst of the flooding, and not the northern areas, which were so badly hit several years ago when hurricane /winter storm Sandy went up the East Coast.

        http://www.nytimes.com/2016/01/25/ny...ides.html?_r=0

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        • #5
          I learned (I should say re-learned) a few things during this blizzard that I won't soon forget. We were relatively lucky and only got a foot... but there are areas not very far away that got up to THREE feet and are still digging out.

          One thing I learned is that it's always important to have a stockpile of those basics... it's easy to think "oh well, I'll just go to the store after they plow" but I've learned that *sometimes* they don't actually plow anything but the major streets for two whole days.... and I learned that if there's as much as a foot of snow, the borough can (and did) prohibit travel of all kinds.

          I'm very glad I had plenty necessities for the family and there wasn't a problem. The roads are still horrid and then it refroze overnight again. This picture is from my back yard on Saturday when it wasn't over yet. (If I upload it correctly, that is... I see it here but not sure it's going to paste into my post.)

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Kate View Post
            I learned (I should say re-learned) a few things during this blizzard that I won't soon forget. We were relatively lucky and only got a foot... but there are areas not very far away that got up to THREE feet and are still digging out.

            One thing I learned is that it's always important to have a stockpile of those basics... it's easy to think "oh well, I'll just go to the store after they plow" but I've learned that *sometimes* they don't actually plow anything but the major streets for two whole days.... and I learned that if there's as much as a foot of snow, the borough can (and did) prohibit travel of all kinds.

            I'm very glad I had plenty necessities for the family and there wasn't a problem. The roads are still horrid and then it refroze overnight again. This picture is from my back yard on Saturday when it wasn't over yet. (If I upload it correctly, that is... I see it here but not sure it's going to paste into my post.)
            Definitely stock up. In the Great Ice Storm of '09, my family decided that it would be a good idea to prepare for roughly 3-4 days without power... We had no power for almost two weeks. And there were areas that were worse than we were! When you hear as much hype about a storm as we did that one, make sure you're ready for the end of the world, because damn - sometimes the hype is actually worth listening to.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by BoredPostman View Post

              Definitely stock up. In the Great Ice Storm of '09, my family decided that it would be a good idea to prepare for roughly 3-4 days without power... We had no power for almost two weeks. And there were areas that were worse than we were! When you hear as much hype about a storm as we did that one, make sure you're ready for the end of the world, because damn - sometimes the hype is actually worth listening to.
              Oh wow, BoredPostman, that is such an extreme power outage! I can't even imagine what that would be like.

              I have to say that even with as overly cautious as I usually am with things like this, I don't think it would ever occur to me to be prepared for more than 3 or 4 days. Maybe 5 at the most, but... no, I'd say 3 or 4 is my norm. (Except for water.. I always have a few weeks' worth of water but that's just what I do... not for disaster prep per se.)

              So what did you do?! Especially for water... and food since all of your fridge and freezer food would have been spoiled by then? Were you even able to stay home for more than a few days? I'm thinking probably not?

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              • #8
                This is terrible for the east coasters. I heard today that they were issuing a bizarre number of parking tickets to the cars that were stuck in the snow. Are you kidding me!? Like these people haven't already been through enough with no power, water, food or more that you have to either tow their car or giving them a parking infraction. This sounds so insane to me. When hurricane Katrina struck, the government wasn't out ticketing the furniture, houses or cars floating down the street in the flood. We are suspose to be the most powerful country in the world, but we never seem to do enough to help the citizens that live here.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by thash1979 View Post
                  This is terrible for the east coasters. I heard today that they were issuing a bizarre number of parking tickets to the cars that were stuck in the snow. Are you kidding me!? Like these people haven't already been through enough with no power, water, food or more that you have to either tow their car or giving them a parking infraction.
                  Well... this isn't exactly accurate. But it does go to show us how rumors get started with social media, I guess. Yes, Washington D.C. was/is issuing tickets to cars stuck in the snow. BUT it's because those very cars had been parked in areas that were clearly marked "Snow Emergency Route, Absolutely No Parking."

                  So by parking illegally, they actually put others in danger because emergency vehicles and snow removal people were to be the only ones on those roads until they were cleared.

                  So maybe the people were through a lot with the blizzard like many of us were, but it's really no excuse to park illegally and then squawk about getting a ticket, methinks.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Kate View Post

                    Oh wow, BoredPostman, that is such an extreme power outage! I can't even imagine what that would be like.

                    I have to say that even with as overly cautious as I usually am with things like this, I don't think it would ever occur to me to be prepared for more than 3 or 4 days. Maybe 5 at the most, but... no, I'd say 3 or 4 is my norm. (Except for water.. I always have a few weeks' worth of water but that's just what I do... not for disaster prep per se.)

                    So what did you do?! Especially for water... and food since all of your fridge and freezer food would have been spoiled by then? Were you even able to stay home for more than a few days? I'm thinking probably not?
                    What we did was my dad walked 5 miles or so into town for bottled water and the like, and we roughed it until emergency crews got things up and running again. But yikes, did that whole experience suck. For the first two days we couldn't even go outside because there was so much ice accumulated on branches - they were snapping off left and right. It sounded like we lived in a war zone.

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                    • #11
                      Thank you Kate for clearing it up. I was seriously in disgust when I seen someone post that they were getting ticketed. Leave it to the morons parking illegally to get an uproar on social media! Lol.

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