Response

Articles about disaster and crisis response and management.


 

Seeking Volunteers for Post-Disaster Updates

Seeking Volunteers for Post-Disaster Updates

In an effort to help, We’d like to launch focus sections of the Disaster.Com site dedicated to coverage of major active disasters – air crashes, hurricanes, earthquakes, tsunamis, etc. When something terrible happens, We would like to create a new section of the site and have links to articles, press releases and other factual (not opinion) pieces aggregated on a 24×7 basis for that specific disaster. To make 24×7 work, We need to have 5-10+ (preferably 10 or more) people from various timezones around the world participate in finding and posting information. It may last for a few days. It may last for a few weeks. There’s no way to know. What we do know is that there is always a significant amount of non-factual information out there (for example – “What air travel experts say may have happened to the Air Asia flight”). These aren’t helpful, and they make real information harder to find. Until we get full coverage, we won’t be able to launch this. If anyone is interested in volunteering (and this is a serious thing – we don’t want people to volunteer and then, when it comes time to do the work, not show up) please fill out a volunteer form or private message us (on the forums) with your timezone, when you would normally be able to dedicate time to doing this, and a list of languages you can speak/translate. Anyone who does participate will get a “FocusWriter” badge, and also be allowed to state on their resume/CV that they are a volunteer here. We’re probably a bit late to do this for the Air Asia tragedy,...
Backup Power for the Individual and Volunteer, Part I:  Generators

Backup Power for the Individual and Volunteer, Part I: Generators

As a loss of power from the grid is a regular occurrence during a disaster, being ready for this eventuality is a necessity. Also, being equipped with backup generators is a standard practice with Emergency Operation Centers (EOC).  Power from the grid may be lost due to an equipment failure, severe weather, natural disaster, deliberate act of disruption (e.g., arson, terrorist attack, hacking, etc.) or from an electromagnetic pulse (EMP).  Such an outage may last a few hours to a few weeks, depending on the size and scope of the disaster. The decision on how to access power when the grid is not an option will vary greatly upon the individual or organization’s location, budget, ability to provide service and maintenance, and other considerations.  However, electrical generators are widely available, cost effective, and may be utilized with limited training.  The following guide is an introduction to electrical generators that are powered via fossil fuels. Portable Generators A portable generator is normally a small, wheeled generator that may be moved from one location to another fairly easily.  Most portable generators are powered by gasoline, but other fuel options are available, such as diesel, propane and kerosene.  Diesel generators tend to be more expensive, but more durable than gasoline models.  Most portable generators produce between 3,000 to 8,500 watts. They can be purchased at most home supply stores and establishments that sell power equipment.  Some also have a Tri-Fuel kit that will allow the generator to run on multiple fuel types with little difficulty. Pros: For powering a limited amount of items (such as lighting, space heating, communication equipment, etc.) a portable generator is adequate. By design, the...
Decision Making in Emergency Response

Decision Making in Emergency Response

Emergency Response could be stated quite simply as problem solving.  Emergencies are typically complex problems with dire consequences that must be solved in a very short amount of time to limit damage to people, property and environment.  The FEMA Emergency Management Higher Education Project College Course Instructor Guide states that an emergency is defined as “An unexpected event which places life and/or property in danger and requires an immediate response through the use of routine community resources and procedures”.  This paper will discuss problem solving and the decision making models used by the Federal Emergency Management Agency among others.  Several examples of how those models have been utilized in real life incidents will be offered.  Some analysis of the effects of those decisions will be made. The Emergency Response Decision Making Model The Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) utilizes a five step model that works in a cycle in its modeling of proper decision making.  According to FEMA the five steps of the basic model are: 1-Determining the Problem, 2-Listing Alternative Solutions, 3-Choosing one Alternative, 4-Implementing the Solution and 5-Evaluating the Solution. This basic model can be used for individual or group decision making.  It must be adapted in crisis situations which place more obstacles in the way of the decision making process.  Important aspects of effective decision making are that they contain the three key factors in crisis decision making: Clear values, quality information and an analytical approach.   A motor vehicle accident is a routine emergency situation faced by emergency responders across the country on a daily basis.  Below is how the decision making process unfolds through...
Write Articles
×
Suggest A Category

 

×