Relief

 

Big Ideas Kill International Development and Relief?

Big Ideas Kill International Development and Relief?

I’m fairly new to the international development community, but I just read this great article on the New Republic site about how new disruptive ideas for humanitarian aid and international development get massive funding because they seem like great ideas, but then dwindle and die long term. I’d love your comments as to whether my ideas below are actionable, right, wrong, and your thoughts on the article. You’ll have to join our forums to comment, but that’s free and only takes a couple of minutes. I was shocked to read this quote.. “Governments and rich people (“major donors” in NGO-ese) are embracing terms like “philanthrocapitalism,” “social entrepreneurship,” and “impact bonds,” arguing that donations are investments, not gifts.” There’s a great story about the fact that sometimes what you THINK is the problem that needs solving with international development and aid  isn’t the actual root issue. Apparently, providing textbooks to kids in Kenya didn’t improve their academics, but providing de-worming pills to make the kids healthier resulted in higher attendance rates at schools and better education – at a cost of 49 cents per pill vs. $2-$4 per textbook. But then they tried to say that this one study proved out that de-worming could be a great global solution, so they went global. Studies have now shown that it increases LIFETIME earnings of recipients by $30. Yes, $30 for their entire life. The article talks about “success, scale, fail” – the trend to find and tout a single successful program, then scale it to try to solve global issues, and then failing to make it work. It also talks about...
Notes from the AIDF Disaster Relief Summit

Notes from the AIDF Disaster Relief Summit

Quite the few days here in Washington DC at the AIDF Disaster Relief Summit. Check out our Twitter stream for all of our updates – and make sure to follow us too! I seem to have had the New York weather follow me down to DC, with temperatures in the twenties and thirties. Oh well. I spent Tuesday morning at the Voice of America studios listening to several expert presentations on journalism in disaster and crisis areas. Lots to learn and think about: Ebola Zone Reporters “Personal Protective Equipment is difficult to use properly. Used improperly, it’s more dangerous than using nothing.” Ebola Zone Reporters “Personal Protective Equipment gives false sense of security and encourages journalists to go places they shouldn’t be” Ebola Zone Reporters “Important to establish consistent safety protocols for your vehicle and hotel room” Information communication IS aid Keep in mind that the responder will be on the defensive when talked to by a journalist Journalists should go to crisis training and simulations so responders become comfortable with who they are Audience “You can’t forget that the CNN in the US is different than the CNN in Africa when it comes to Ebola reporting.” Technology innovation today allows for “care and outcomes” influenced across the total end to end care pathway In the US, first responders often have access to multiple vehicles. Elsewhere, you need multi-purpose vehicles. One of the more interesting statements I heard was one I really like. “Information IS aid”. Journalists, and sites like Disaster.Com, that provide information about disasters and crises are providing a form of aid to communities. Over the other two days of the conference we’ve...
Write Articles
×
Suggest A Category

 

×